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Latest Forensic evidence Stories

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2008-10-10 12:47:08

University of Michigan researchers have developed a new tool that uses natural "fingerprints" in coal to track down sources of mercury polluting the environment. The research is published in today's online issue of the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Mercury is a naturally occurring element, but some 2000 tons of it enter the environment each year from human-generated sources such as incinerators, chlorine-producing plants and coal-burning power plants. Mercury is deposited...

2008-09-28 03:00:20

By Arellano, Jonah If you can afford a Porsche, you might be able to swing the $1,700 price tag for the P9251 cell phone, featuring a "super- secure" fingerprint identification system. The phone's unique design allows users to "flip" it 360 degrees, and the unit also has a personal concierge system. [www.theweekdaily.conn] Copyright National Telephone Cooperative Jul/Aug 2008 (c) 2008 Rural Telecommunications. Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.

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2008-09-18 08:10:00

Inventor of forensic fingerprint technique says criminals who eat processed foods have 'sticky fingers,' which are more likely to corrode metal The inventor of a revolutionary new forensic fingerprinting technique claims criminals who eat processed foods are more likely to be discovered by police through their fingerprint sweat corroding metal. Dr John Bond, a researcher at the University of Leicester and scientific support officer at Northamptonshire Police, said processed food fans are more...

2008-09-16 00:00:21

Crooks who eat junk food are more likely leave fingerprints at the scene of their crimes because salty takeaways increase sweat, producing the better tell-tale signs, say forensics experts. (c) 2008 Daily Record; Glasgow (UK). Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.

2008-09-13 03:00:22

By Castelvecchi, Davide New tests can reveal signs of explosives, drugs Fingerprints can tell a lot more about people - what they've touched, what they've eaten, what drugs they've taken - than just their identities. A new analytic tool could make it easier to spot terrorists and diagnose diseases from telltale chemical markers. The method, described in the Aug. 8 Science, can map a fingerprint based on the presence of virtually any water-soluble chemical. "It's the difference between a...

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2008-09-05 16:49:44

Scientists in Britain have developed a new method to fight crime by allowing police to lift fingerprints from bullets, even after a criminal wipes down a shell casing. Law enforcement authorities in the U.S. and Britain have already used the new technique to re-open three cold cases. John Bond, the physicist who developed the technique, said police are now optimistic of solving one such case, a double murder that occurred in the United States. "In one case there was enough evidence that...

2008-09-02 18:00:03

A MAN'S bid to cash in his pounds 300,000 life insurance policy was foiled when his own fingerprints were found on his fake death certificate. Afghan Ahmed Akhtary, 34, obtained the forgery in his home country but back in Britain, the dad of three bizarrely lived an open life and went to work in a factory as usual. His "unsophisticated" plot was foiled when insurers Norwich Union were told he went to his doctor six months after his supposed death. Akhtary's ex-wife Anne, 43, who was...

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2008-08-29 09:15:00

Technique developed by University of Leicester and Northamptonshire police A double murder investigation that has remained unsolved for almost a decade could be provided new impetus following a forensic breakthrough at the University of Leicester. A leading detective from America is visiting forensic scientists at the University of Leicester and Northamptonshire Police in a bid to shed new light on the investigation. He will meet with Dr John Bond a forensic research scientist at the...

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2008-08-27 09:35:00

A double murder investigation that has remained unsolved for almost a decade could be provided new impetus following a forensic breakthrough at the University of Leicester.A leading detective from America is visiting forensic scientists at the University of Leicester and Northamptonshire Police in a bid to shed new light on the investigation.He will meet with Dr John Bond a forensic research scientist at the University of Leicester and scientific support manager at Northamptonshire Police. Dr...

2008-08-12 03:00:53

WASHINGTON - Scientists have found ways to tease even more clues out of fingerprints' telltale marks - one in a string of developments that gives modern forensics even better ways to solve mysteries like the anthrax attacks or JonBenet Ramsey's murder. For example, if a person handled cocaine, explosives or other materials, there could be enough left in a fingerprint to identify them, says chemist R. Graham Cooks of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind. Progress in forensics...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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