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Latest Fossil Stories

51e93af61e107529a702327cf0913fb41
2008-07-31 09:35:41

Paleontologists in 2005 hailed research that apparently showed that soft, pliable tissues had been recovered from dissolved dinosaur bones, a major finding that would substantially widen the known range of preserved biomolecules. But new research challenges that finding and suggests that the supposed recovered dinosaur tissue is in reality biofilm "“ or slime. "I believed that preserved soft tissues had been found, but I had to change my opinion," said Thomas Kaye, an associate...

2008-07-10 09:00:00

By William Mullen, Chicago Tribune Jul. 10--Some dusty fish fossils spotted by a sharp-eyed University of Chicago doctoral student as he rummaged through forgotten corners of museum collections in Europe have answered a question that has long vexed scientists. The puzzling question was: How did flatfish, a bizarre, highly specialized group of bottom-feeding fish that are some of nature's most delicious creatures--sole, plaice, turbot, flounder and halibut among them--end up with both of...

2008-07-10 00:00:09

CHICAGO _ Some dusty fossil fish spotted by a sharp-eyed University of Chicago doctoral student as he rummaged through forgotten corners of museum collections in Europe have solved a question that has long vexed scientists. The puzzling question was: How did flatfish, a bizarre, highly specialized group of bottom-feeding fish that are some of nature's most delicious creatures _ sole, plaice, turbot, flounder and halibut among them _ end up with both of their eyes on one side of their faces?...

c304da5a1f53afeb6902c4204e73db8c
2008-06-08 20:00:00

For the first time paleontologists have found fossilized burrows of tetrapods "“ any land vertebrates with four legs or leglike appendages "“ in Antarctica dating from the Early Triassic epoch, about 245 million years ago.The fossils were created when fine sand from an overflowing river poured into the animals' burrows and hardened into casts of the open spaces. The largest preserved piece is about 14 inches long, 6 inches wide and 3 inches deep. No animal remains were found...

1f360b57696de5b26de86a010fc8e99a
2008-04-01 18:45:00

Paleontologists' vision of the past is becoming remarkably clearer thanks to a revolutionary new "supercamera." Located in Grenoble, France, the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) uses an intense light capable of piercing almost any material. Synchrotron technology has benefitted the efforts of French paleontologists such as Paul Tafforeau and Malvina Lak at the University of Rennes who have used the camera to study 640 blocks of opaque amber from the Charentes region in...

2008-03-12 03:00:21

By Singleton, Scott Karnes and Live Oak counties and surrounding areas in South Texas (fig. 2) are popular petrified-wood hunting grounds because the late Eocene to Oligocene sediments have undergone extensive primary and secondary mineralization, producing wonderfully colored and patterned specimens. In fact, this same mineralization is responsible for the leaching and subsequent concen tration of uranium at the unconformity between the uppermost Jackson Group (Eocene) and the Oligocene...

d3186362a6770b4cdd6345f482e964201
2008-02-22 16:30:00

The oldest fossils to date of early rabbit relatives were recently unearthed. These specimens, which are 53 million years old, are tiny ankle bones which are clearly adapted to running. These fossils belong to lagomorphs, a group which currently includes rabbits, hares and pikas. Prior to this finding which is published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the oldest known lagomorphs dated to around 48 million years ago. The ankle bones which were found in...

ce1752affdad5864beb8544d40f8f4b2
2008-02-06 17:31:37

Crayfish body fossils and burrows discovered in Victoria, Australia, have provided the first physical evidence that crayfish existed on the continent as far back as the Mesozoic Era, says Emory University paleontologist Anthony Martin, who headed up a study on the finds. "Studying the fossil burrows gives us a glimpse into the ecology of southern Australia about 115 million years ago, when the continent was still attached to Antarctica," says Martin, a senior lecturer in environmental studies...

5bc7142e1197bd3799ca417e6ca4fe2b
2008-02-05 17:40:00

Did modern birds originate around the time of the dinosaurs' demise, or have they been around far longer? The question is at the center of a sometimes contentious "rocks versus clocks" debate between paleontologists, whose estimates are based on the fossil record, and scientists who use "molecular clock" methods to study evolutionary history. A new analysis by researchers at the University of Michigan, the University of Chicago, the Centre for Biodiversity Conservation Mexico and Central...

2008-01-28 11:40:00

Nearly a half a billion years ago, tiny horseshoe crabs crept along the shorelines much like today's larger versions do, new fossil evidence suggests. Two nearly complete fossil specimens discovered in Canada reveal a new genus of horseshoe crab, pushing their origins back at least 100 million years earlier than previously thought. Dubbed Lunataspis aurora, the ancient horseshoe crab is estimated to have been just 1.5 inches (4 centimeters) from head to tail-tip. That's much smaller than...


Latest Fossil Reference Libraries

Atrypa
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Atrypa (lampshell) is an extinct genus of brachiopod from the Late Ordovician stage (444 million years ago) to the Carboniferous stage (318 mya). It occurs abundantly as fossils in marine rocks. Fossils have been found on all continents except Antarctica. This animal has distinctive concentric growth lines and is unusual in that in some Devonian beds there are numerous remains of the pedicle (foot) valve, but very few of the brachial (upper) valve -- scientists speculate that strong ocean...

45_d90d7517475790ab9d0e7b112e243a9d
2010-09-30 18:58:57

Seitaad, derived from a Navajo legend of a san monster with the same name -- "Seit'aad," is a genus of prosauropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic Period. The type species, S. ruessi, was described in 2010 based on fossils recovered from the Navajo Sandstone Formation in southern Utah. It is known from a nearly complete fossil that appears to have been entombed by the collapse of a sand dune about 185 million years ago. Based on the fossil, the dinosaur would have been 10 to 15 feet long...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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