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Latest Fossil Stories

2013-01-03 11:04:17

Of all the famous fossil localities in the world – Mongolia´s Flaming Cliffs, Tanzania´s Olduvai Gorge, Wyoming´s Green River, Germany´s Solnhöfn Quarry – perhaps none is as widely celebrated as British Columbia´s Burgess Shale. High in the Canadian Rockies, the Burgess Shale contains some of the oldest and most exquisitely detailed fossils of early life on Earth. Visiting the Burgess Shale requires some preparation – you must hire a...

Scientists Find Oldest Fossils On Earth
2013-01-02 10:32:42

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In a sun-scorched region of Western Australia known as Pilbara, a team of American and Australian paleobiologists believe they have located the oldest known evidence of life on Earth. The ancient bacterial fossils have been dated as 3.49 billion years old, only about a billion years after scientists estimate the Earth was formed. “It´s not just finding this stuff that´s interesting,” said Alan Decho, a...

New Test Helps With Understanding Earth’s History And Resources
2012-12-06 10:18:32

University of Florida A new study co-authored by a University of Florida researcher provides the first direct chronological test of sequence stratigraphy, a powerful tool for exploring Earth´s natural resources. The model allows geologists to better understand how sedimentary rocks are related to one another in time and space and predict what types of rocks are located in different areas. The information may help scientists more reliably interpret various aspects of Earth´s...

Spanish Researchers Unearth Oldest Fossils Related To Giant Panda
2012-11-15 08:07:34

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online When we think of pandas, we often think of China, where the gentle giants are found. But not all pandas have necessarily hailed from the Far East. That´s a new theory from Spanish researchers who have unearthed the oldest fossils of what could be a close relative of the giant panda. The fossils are of two individuals, being called Kretzoiarctos beatrix, and are between 11.5 million and 12.5 million years old, according to the...

Paleontology And Development Genetics Help Piece Together Evolutionary History
2012-11-08 06:30:08

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Developmental genetics and paleontology seem worlds away from each other and the gulf between fossils and petri dishes seems insurmountable. Even the essential questions of the two disciplines are miles apart. Paleontology strives to determine "What happened in evolution?", while developmental genetics uses gene control in embryos to try to answer "How did it happen?" Scientists have been combining the two, however, with some remarkable...

100-Million-Year-Old Fossil From Texas Is New Fish Species
2012-10-25 12:45:29

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online 100-million year old pieces of tiny fossil skull found in Fort Worth, Texas, have been identified as a new species of coelacanth fish, according to paleontologist John F. Graf of Southern Methodist University (SMU) in Dallas. At 400 million years, the coelacanth has one of the longest lineages of any animal. The coelacanth is the most closely related fish to vertebrates, including humans. The findings of this discovery were published...

Celebrate National Fossil Day On October 17
2012-10-14 04:52:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online October 17, 2012 is National Fossil Day, sponsored by the National Park Service (NPS) and the American Geological Institute (AGI). This year is the third annual event, scheduled in conjunction with Earth Science Week. The mission of National Fossil Day is to promote public awareness and stewardship of fossils. The NPS hopes to foster an appreciation of the scientific and educational value of fossil preservation and study. "Fossils...

Ancient Origins Of Modern-day Deep-sea Animals Suggested By New Fossils
2012-10-11 08:18:53

A collection of fossil animals discovered off the coast of Florida suggests that present day deep-sea fauna like sea urchins, starfish and sea cucumbers may have evolved earlier than previously believed and survived periods of mass extinctions similar to those that wiped out the dinosaurs. The full results are published Oct. 10 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Ben Thuy and colleagues from the University of Göttingen, Germany. Previously, researchers believed that these...

Graptolite Fossils Offer New Insights On Colony Complexity
2012-10-03 09:48:09

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In what is perhaps the best outcome of hoarding ever, researchers revisited the fossil records of a specimen that has been stored in a museum for over a century. Dr. Jan Zalasiewicz of the Department of Geology at the University of Leicester reviewed the fossil of the graptolite, a member of a planktonic colony that existed nearly a half billion years ago. This specific specimen was found in the Southern Uplands of Scotland....

multiplacophoran reconstruction
2012-09-20 10:30:45

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Using computer animation, CT scanning and 3-D printing technology, a team led by University of Texas at Austin paleontologist Jakob Vinther has reconstructed an ancient mollusk that inhabited the waters around modern day Ohio about 390 million years ago. Until now, only a few partial fossils of the creature, known as a multiplacophoran, existed and the new model allows paleontologists to study the physiology of the specimen in greater...


Latest Fossil Reference Libraries

Atrypa
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Atrypa (lampshell) is an extinct genus of brachiopod from the Late Ordovician stage (444 million years ago) to the Carboniferous stage (318 mya). It occurs abundantly as fossils in marine rocks. Fossils have been found on all continents except Antarctica. This animal has distinctive concentric growth lines and is unusual in that in some Devonian beds there are numerous remains of the pedicle (foot) valve, but very few of the brachial (upper) valve -- scientists speculate that strong ocean...

45_d90d7517475790ab9d0e7b112e243a9d
2010-09-30 18:58:57

Seitaad, derived from a Navajo legend of a san monster with the same name -- "Seit'aad," is a genus of prosauropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic Period. The type species, S. ruessi, was described in 2010 based on fossils recovered from the Navajo Sandstone Formation in southern Utah. It is known from a nearly complete fossil that appears to have been entombed by the collapse of a sand dune about 185 million years ago. Based on the fossil, the dinosaur would have been 10 to 15 feet long...

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.