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Latest Fossil Stories

Image 1 - Aquatic Beetle Found In 20-million-year-old Sediments
2011-10-06 08:46:47

The fossil beetle discovered in the 16-23 million years old sediments of the Irtysh River in southern Siberia belongs to the modern species Helophorus sibiricus, a member of the water scavenger beetles (Hydrophiloidea), which is at present widely distributed in Eurasia and reaches even North America. The species was originally described in 1860 by the Russian entomologist Victor Motschulsky based on specimens collected at Lake Baikal. It is aquatic and inhabits various kinds of standing...

New Technique Fills In Fossil Record Gaps
2011-09-20 04:53:20

  University of Pennsylvania evolutionary biologists have resolved a long-standing paleontological problem by reconciling the fossil record of species diversity with modern DNA samples. Cataloging the diversity of life on earth is challenging enough, but when scientists attempt to draw a phylogeny – the branching family tree of a group of species over their evolutionary history – the challenge goes from merely difficult to potentially impossible. The fossil record is...

Beaver Have Experienced Little Change Over 7 Million Years
2011-09-19 10:01:11

  The fossilized teeth of a beaver found by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) employees on federal land represents the earliest record of the animal in North America and are estimated to be 7 to 7.3 million years old. The teeth come from the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, a protected area with an abundance of fossils, Fox News is reporting. Surprisingly, the fossil teeth are almost identical to the chompers of living beavers and illustrate that the animal has changed little...

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2011-07-30 06:10:00

The remains of a rare, prehistoric marine reptile that was discovered by Alaskan scientists is being called the most complete fossil representation of this creature ever located in North America, according to Daily Mail and Reuters reports on Friday. According to the Daily Mail newspaper, the remains are of a nearly-complete thalattosaur, which is a three-to-ten foot long sea creature, with a long, flat tail, which had died out approximately 200 million years ago. They note that the fossils...

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2011-07-21 09:15:00

Rare find alters origins and distribution of Terminonaris; first home was Texas and North America "” not Europe By Margaret Allen, SMU Making its first appearance in Texas, a prehistoric crocodile thought to have originated in Europe now appears to have been a native of the Lone Star State. The switch in origins for the genus known as Terminonaris is based on the identification of a well-preserved, narrow fossil snout that was discovered along the shoreline of a lake near Dallas. The...

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2011-06-16 05:30:00

According to MIT researchers, new fossils suggest life had a rapid recovery after a global freeze. Researchers at MIT, Harvard University and Smith College discovered hundreds of microscopic fossils in rocks dating back about 710 million years, which is around the time frame that the planet emerged from the "Snowball Earth" event. The team said new fossils are remnants of tiny organisms that survived the harsh post-glacial environment by building armor and reaching out with microscopic...

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2011-05-18 09:53:19

Scientists have used the latest computer-imaging technology to produce stunning three-dimensional pictures of a 49 million-year-old spider trapped inside an opaque piece of fossilized amber resin. University of Manchester researchers, working with colleagues in Germany, created the intricate images using X-ray computed tomography to study the remarkable spider, which can barely be seen under the microscope in the old and darkened amber. Writing in the international journal...

2011-05-16 15:37:31

A University of Alberta-led research team has discovered that billions of years before life evolved in the oceans, thin layers of microbial matter in shallow water produced enough oxygen to support tiny, mobile life forms. The researchers say worm-like creatures could have lived on the oxygen produced by photosynthetic microbial material, even though oxygen concentrations in the surrounding water were not high enough to support life. The research was conducted in shallow lagoons in Venezuela...

2011-04-14 12:10:39

Remote lochs along the west coast of Scotland are turning up new evidence about the origins of life on land. A team of scientists from the University of Sheffield, the University of Oxford and Boston College, who are exploring rocks around Loch Torridon, have discovered the remarkably preserved remains of organisms that once lived on the bottom of ancient lake beds as long as a billion (1,000 million) years ago. These fossils illuminate a key moment in the history of evolution when life made...

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2011-02-17 12:45:23

Scientists have discovered that a community of seaweeds and worm-like animals lived in a quiet deep-water niche under the sea about 600 million years ago near what is now Lantian, which is a small village in Anhul Province of South China. The scientists identified about 15 different species at the site, in addition to the ancient versions of algae and worms. The researchers said that the fossils suggest that morphological diversification of macroscopic eukaryotes may have occurred only tens...


Latest Fossil Reference Libraries

Atrypa
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Atrypa (lampshell) is an extinct genus of brachiopod from the Late Ordovician stage (444 million years ago) to the Carboniferous stage (318 mya). It occurs abundantly as fossils in marine rocks. Fossils have been found on all continents except Antarctica. This animal has distinctive concentric growth lines and is unusual in that in some Devonian beds there are numerous remains of the pedicle (foot) valve, but very few of the brachial (upper) valve -- scientists speculate that strong ocean...

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2010-09-30 18:58:57

Seitaad, derived from a Navajo legend of a san monster with the same name -- "Seit'aad," is a genus of prosauropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic Period. The type species, S. ruessi, was described in 2010 based on fossils recovered from the Navajo Sandstone Formation in southern Utah. It is known from a nearly complete fossil that appears to have been entombed by the collapse of a sand dune about 185 million years ago. Based on the fossil, the dinosaur would have been 10 to 15 feet long...

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