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Latest Fred Gage Stories

New Therapeutic Option Derived From Cord Blood Cells
2012-07-16 15:02:22

Protocol may open new avenues for cell-replacement therapies for neurological conditions For more than 20 years, doctors have been using cells from blood that remains in the placenta and umbilical cord after childbirth to treat a variety of illnesses, from cancer and immune disorders to blood and metabolic diseases. Now, scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have found a new way-using a single protein, known as a transcription factor-to convert cord blood (CB) cells...

2010-11-17 21:18:03

With few exceptions, jumping genes-restless bits of DNA that can move freely about the genome-are forced to stay put. In patients with Rett syndrome, however, a mutation in the MeCP2 gene mobilizes so-called L1 retrotransposons in brain cells, reshuffling their genomes and possibly contributing to the symptoms of the disease when they find their way into active genes, report researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. Their findings, published in the November 18, 2010 issue of...

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2010-07-02 08:11:47

Stem cells in the brain remain dormant until called upon to divide and make more neurons. However, little has been known about the molecular guards that keep them quiet. Now scientists from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified the signal that prevents stem cells from proliferating, protecting the brain against too much cell division and ensuring a pool of neural stem cells that lasts a lifetime. The research, which was published in the July 1 issue of Cell Stem Cell,...

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2009-08-05 14:15:00

Rather than sticking to a single DNA script, human brain cells harbor astonishing genomic variability, according to scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. The findings, to be published in the Aug. 5, 2009, advance online edition of Nature, could help explain brain development and individuality, as well as lead to a better understanding of neurological disease.The team, led by Fred Gage, Ph.D., a professor in the Salk's Laboratory of Genetics and holder of the Vi and John...

2009-01-29 08:25:00

"Remember when"¦?" is how many a wistful trip down memory lane begins. But just how the brain keeps tabs on what happened and when is still a matter of speculation. A computational model developed by scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies now suggests that newborn brain cells"”generated by the thousands each day"”add a time-related code, which is unique to memories formed around the same time."By labeling contemporary events as similar, new neurons allow us...

2008-08-21 15:01:06

To: NATIONAL EDITORS Contact: Maggie Goldberg of the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation, +1-973-379-2690 ext. 7115, media@ChristopherReeve.org Pfaff Brings Expertise in Motor Neuron Development to the Foundation's Efforts on Behalf of People living with Spinal Cord Injury SHORT HILLS, N.J., Aug. 21 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation today announced it has expanded the work of its International Consortium on Spinal Cord Injury to include a focus on...

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2005-12-12 17:15:00

SAN FRANCISCO -- Add another creation to the strange scientific menagerie where animal species are being mixed together in ever more exotic combinations. Scientists announced Monday that they had created mice with small amounts of human brain cells in an effort to make realistic models of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Led by Fred Gage of the Salk Institute in San Diego, the researchers created the mice by injecting about 100,000 human embryonic stem cells per mouse...


Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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