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Latest Freezing Stories

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2010-08-25 20:02:57

RUB chemists unmask natural antifreezeTogether with cooperation partners from the U.S., the researchers surrounding Prof. Dr. Martina Havenith (Physical Chemistry II of the RUB) describe their discovery in a so-termed Rapid Communication in the prestigious American chemistry journal, the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS). The journal's independent reviewers evaluated the work as one of the top 5% of all submissions.Better than household antifreezeTemperatures of minus 1.8 °...

2010-07-01 16:13:06

New research by UC Davis wheat geneticist Jorge Dubcovsky and his colleagues could lead to new strategies for improving freezing tolerance in wheat, which provides more than one-fifth of the calories consumed by people around the world. The new findings, published June 22 in the Online First issue of the journal Plant Physiology, shed light on the connection between flowering and freezing tolerance in wheat. In winter wheat and barley varieties, long exposures to non-freezing cold...

2010-04-21 13:55:56

Supercooling, a state where liquids do not solidify even below their normal freezing point, still puzzles scientists today. A good example of this phenomenon is found everyday in meteorology: clouds in high altitude are an accumulation of supercooled droplets of water below their freezing point. Scientists from the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA), the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the ESRF have found an...

2010-03-03 13:41:11

KINGSTON, ON "“ The same antifreeze proteins that keep organisms from freezing in cold environments can also prevent ice from melting at warmer temperatures, according to a new Queen's University study. The study presents the first direct measurements of the superheating of ice crystals in antifreeze protein solutions. Superheated ice crystals can be stabilized above the melting point for hours, at a maximum temperature of about +0.5 degree Celsius. "You can hold the ice crystal at...

2010-03-01 16:14:20

Scientists publish first direct measurements of 'superheating' phenomenon The same antifreeze proteins that keep organisms from freezing in cold environments also can prevent ice from melting at warmer temperatures, according to a new Ohio University and Queen's University study published today in the Early Edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Antifreeze proteins are found in insects, fish, bacteria and other organisms that need to survive in cold...

2009-12-18 13:58:59

Using a microscope the size of a football field, researchers from The University of Western Ontario are studying why some insects can survive freezing, while others cannot. Why is this important? Because the common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) is one of the bugs that cannot survive freezing and the little creature just so happens to share much of the same genetic makeup as humans, therefore finding a way to freeze them for research purposes is a top priority for geneticists the world...

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2009-12-15 07:24:15

Scientists have identified a novel antifreeze molecule in a freeze-tolerant Alaska beetle able to survive temperatures below minus 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Unlike all previously described biological antifreezes that contain protein, this new molecule, called xylomannan, has little or no protein. It is composed of a sugar and a fatty acid and may exist in new places within the cells of organisms. "The most exciting part of this discovery is that this molecule is a whole new kind of antifreeze...

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2009-11-24 08:48:11

Water expands when it freezes. Anyone who has ever left a can of soda or bottle of water in the freezer too long has witnessed this first hand. So how do plants and animals survive severe temperatures? Insects exposed to subzero temperatures can adapt to the extreme climate to survive freezing temperatures, but until now, antifreeze molecules had not been isolated from freeze-tolerant animals. The NSF-supported study, published in the November 24 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy...

2006-02-14 00:53:11

By Chris Buckley BEIJING (Reuters) - A former secretary to Chairman Mao Zedong and a dozen other senior Chinese scholars and ex-officials have denounced the shutdown of an investigative weekly in a spreading battle over censorship. They said the closing of the Freezing Point section of the China Youth Daily was an "historic incident" in a struggle between Communist Party controls and calls for media freedom. "History demonstrates that only a totalitarian system needs news...

2005-10-20 13:45:09

By Julie Mollins TORONTO (Reuters) - Tiny fleas that survive on fungus found under a blanket of snow contain a unique antifreeze that could have implications for farming or transplant surgery, Canadian researchers said on Wednesday. The researchers, whose report is published in the latest edition of Science, said their findings could help protect plants or animals from frost, or allow donated transplant organs to be stored and transported at lower temperatures. The six-legged snow...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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