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2009-12-29 12:30:00

Japanese researchers have succeeded in producing goldfish whose beating hearts can be seen through translucent scales and skin, AFP reported. The development is just one part of efforts to reduce the need for school dissections, which have become increasingly controversial, particularly in schools. Yutaka Tamaru, an associate professor in the department of life science at Mie University, said the fish allow them to see a live heart and other organs because the scales and skin have no...

2009-11-11 17:33:56

Amphibians, for years considered a leading indicator of environmental degradation, are not uniquely susceptible to pollution, according to a meta-analysis to be published in Ecology Letters. After a review of over 28,000 toxicological tests, researchers from the University of South Dakota, Yale University and Washington State University are challenging the prevailing view that amphibians, with their permeable skin and aquatic environment, are particularly sensitive to environmental threats...

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2009-11-03 14:18:43

MU researchers find clear-cutting is harmful to the terrestrial stage of amphibians Frogs are croaking in clear-cut forests, but not exactly in their traditional manner. University of Missouri researchers found that removing all of the trees from a section of the forest had a negative effect on amphibians during their later life cycles, but had some positive effects during amphibians' aquatic larva stages at the beginning of their lives. To lessen the negative effects during the later life...

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2009-10-30 10:56:59

Frogs can smell predators when they are still embryos, scientists announced recently. Researchers in the US and Canada discovered that woodfrog embryos could sense any "level of threat" created by salamanders, their enemies. Embryos placed in water full of the odor of salamanders and the smell of hurt tadpoles memorized the predator's scent as a threat. Maud Ferarri, biologist from the University of California, Davis, finds that this kind of learning had been tested in fish, amphibians and...

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2009-10-19 14:27:35

A workshop at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama has dramatically improved the ability of conservationists and regulatory agencies to monitor the spread of chytridiomycosis"”one of the deadliest frog diseases on Earth. Caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, this disease is probably responsible for the extinction of nearly 100 frog species since the 1970s. During the past decade, the epidemic swept from the highlands of Costa Rica through western...

2009-09-29 19:16:59

Two University of South Florida biologists say the popular weed killer atrazine interferes with the growth of fish and amphibians. Jason Rohr and Krista McCoy, in an article published in Environmental Health Perspectives, reported on their examination of more than 100 studies of the environmental effects of atrazine, The St. Petersburg Times reported. The studies showed that the weed killer does not kill fish or amphibians but can cause changes in their reproductive, immune and other...

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2009-08-27 06:45:00

The world's leading amphibian experts have come together and for the first time identified two major conservation initiatives to protect the amphibians of the world from becoming extinct. The new coalition of organizations, the Amphibian Survival Alliance, will work together on scientific research and fund-raising to focus on containing the spread of the amphibian chytrid fungus and protecting the only amphibian habitats that contain amphibians that are not found anywhere else in the world....

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2009-08-21 14:50:00

Male frogs living near urban areas are having trouble competing with the sound of the city, which may be causing the frog population to decline. Male frogs use their croaks to attract their mates. But Melbourne University ecologist Kirsten Parris found that the frogs face a tough task in trying to overpower the loud noise from nearby traffic. "If there are a number of different males calling, the one that sounds the best often gets the girl," Parris told The Associated Press. "You have to be...

2009-08-18 13:01:20

Scientists say the four-day testing period the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses to determine safe levels of pesticide exposure is too short. The University of Pittsburgh researchers said they found the highly toxic pesticide endosulfan -- a neurotoxin banned in several nations, but still used extensively in U.S. agriculture -- can exhibit a lag effect with the fallout from exposure not occurring until after direct contact has ended. The team that included lead author Devin Jones,...

2009-08-17 16:30:00

The four-day testing period the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commonly uses to determine safe levels of pesticide exposure for humans and animals could fail to account for the toxins' long-term effects, University of Pittsburgh researchers report in the September edition of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.The team found that the highly toxic pesticide endosulfan"”a neurotoxin banned in several nations but still used extensively in U.S. agriculture"”can exhibit...


Latest Frog Reference Libraries

Bleating Tree Frog, Litoria dentata
2014-06-30 14:33:50

The Bleating Tree Frog (Litoria dentata) is a tree frog belonging to the family Hylidae. This frog is native to coastal eastern Australia, from southeastern Queensland, to around Eden, New South Wales. As it is a small frog, it measures up to 45 millimeters long. The dorsal surface of this frog is a dark or pale, rich brown, with broad and irregular bands on each side of the frog starting from the back of the eye. A dark colored stripe extends from the snout, through the eye, and onto the...

Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog, Litoria fallax
2014-05-26 10:53:47

The Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog (Litoria fallax) is a small and very common tree frog located on the eastern coast of Australia, from around Cairns, Queensland, to around Ulladulla, New South Wales. Individuals of this species are often found somewhere else, having been accidentally relocated by transported fruit boxes. Confirmed sightings of breeding pairs have confirmed their survival in Victoria’s cooler climate. This is a small species; the females can reach a maximum size of 25 to 30...

African Red Toad, Schismaderma Carens
2013-11-22 13:31:33

The African Red Toad, Schismaderma Carens, known also as the African Split-Skin Toad, is a species of toad belonging to the family Bufonidae. It’s monotypic within the genus Schismaderma. It is located in Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Kenya, Mozambique, South Africa, Namibia, Swaziland, Zambia, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, and possibly Lesotho. The natural habitats are dry savanna, moist savanna, tropical or subtropical dry shrubland, tropical or subtropical moist...

Argentine Horned Frog, Ceratophrys Ornata
2013-11-22 09:57:33

The Argentine Horned Frog, Ceratophrys Ornata, also known as the Argentine Wide-Mouthed Frog or Pacman frog, is the most common species of Horned frog, located in the rain forests or Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil. As a voracious eater, it will attempt to swallow anything that moves close to its wide mouth, such as insects, lizards, rodents, and other frogs, even if this predator would suffocate in the process. The female frog can grow to be 6.5 inches snout to vent and the males can reach...

Littlejohn’s Tree Frog, Litoria littlejohni
2013-10-09 12:26:27

The Littlejohn’s Tree Frog (Litoria littlejohni), known also as the Heath Frog or the Orange-Bellied Tree Frog, is a species of tree frog that is native to eastern Australia from Wyong, New South Wales, to Buchan, Victoria. Measuring about 60 millimeters in length, this frog is of medium size. It is usually brown or grey-brown on the dorsal surface with many scattered darker colored flecks and spots. Often, a faint darker patch is featured on the back. A dark line extends from behind the...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.