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2009-10-19 14:27:35

A workshop at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama has dramatically improved the ability of conservationists and regulatory agencies to monitor the spread of chytridiomycosis"”one of the deadliest frog diseases on Earth. Caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, this disease is probably responsible for the extinction of nearly 100 frog species since the 1970s. During the past decade, the epidemic swept from the highlands of Costa Rica through western...

2009-09-29 19:16:59

Two University of South Florida biologists say the popular weed killer atrazine interferes with the growth of fish and amphibians. Jason Rohr and Krista McCoy, in an article published in Environmental Health Perspectives, reported on their examination of more than 100 studies of the environmental effects of atrazine, The St. Petersburg Times reported. The studies showed that the weed killer does not kill fish or amphibians but can cause changes in their reproductive, immune and other...

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2009-08-27 06:45:00

The world's leading amphibian experts have come together and for the first time identified two major conservation initiatives to protect the amphibians of the world from becoming extinct. The new coalition of organizations, the Amphibian Survival Alliance, will work together on scientific research and fund-raising to focus on containing the spread of the amphibian chytrid fungus and protecting the only amphibian habitats that contain amphibians that are not found anywhere else in the world....

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2009-08-21 14:50:00

Male frogs living near urban areas are having trouble competing with the sound of the city, which may be causing the frog population to decline. Male frogs use their croaks to attract their mates. But Melbourne University ecologist Kirsten Parris found that the frogs face a tough task in trying to overpower the loud noise from nearby traffic. "If there are a number of different males calling, the one that sounds the best often gets the girl," Parris told The Associated Press. "You have to be...

2009-08-18 13:01:20

Scientists say the four-day testing period the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses to determine safe levels of pesticide exposure is too short. The University of Pittsburgh researchers said they found the highly toxic pesticide endosulfan -- a neurotoxin banned in several nations, but still used extensively in U.S. agriculture -- can exhibit a lag effect with the fallout from exposure not occurring until after direct contact has ended. The team that included lead author Devin Jones,...

2009-08-17 16:30:00

The four-day testing period the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commonly uses to determine safe levels of pesticide exposure for humans and animals could fail to account for the toxins' long-term effects, University of Pittsburgh researchers report in the September edition of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.The team found that the highly toxic pesticide endosulfan"”a neurotoxin banned in several nations but still used extensively in U.S. agriculture"”can exhibit...

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2009-08-17 16:00:00

Researchers in China have discovered the first protein-based toxin in an amphibian "“a 60 amino acid neurotoxin found in the skin of a Chinese tree frog. This finding may help shed more light into both the evolution of amphibians and the evolution of poison.While gene-encoded protein toxins have been identified in many vertebrate animals, including fish, reptiles and mammals, none have yet been found in amphibians or birds. In the case of poisonous amphibians, like the tropical poison...

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2009-08-10 09:35:00

More than 350 new species including the world's smallest deer, a flying frog, a 100 million-year old gecko, and the first new monkey to have been discovered in over a century have been found in the last ten years located in the Eastern Himalayas. Now, climate change threatens this biologically rich habitat. An environmental group says the growing pressures from unsustainable development in the area is confronting the vital habitats of the mountain range spanning across Nepal, China, India,...

2009-07-28 11:15:00

For the first time in nearly 50 years, a population of a nearly extinct frog has been rediscovered in the San Bernardino National Forest's San Jacinto Wilderness. Biologists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessing suitability of sites to re-establish frogs and scientists from the San Diego Natural History Museum retracing a 1908 natural history expedition both rediscovered the rare mountain yellow-legged frog in the San Jacinto Wilderness near Idyllwild, Calif.This re-discovery...

2009-07-27 11:11:41

Dr Amber Teacher, studying a post-doctorate at Royal Holloway, University of London, has discovered evidence that a disease may be causing a behavioral change in frogs. The research, published in the August edition of Molecular Ecology, has unearthed a surprising fact about our long-tongued friends: wild frogs in the UK may be changing their mating behavior.Dr Teacher conducted her research with colleagues from the Institute of Zoology and Queen Mary, University of London. The research...


Latest Frog Reference Libraries

Foothill Yellow-Legged Frog, Rana boylii
2014-09-16 08:43:34

The Foothill Yellow-Legged Frog (Rana boylii) is a small frog measuring about 1.46 to 3.2 inches. It belongs to the genus Rana within the Ranidae family. This species can be found from northern Oregon, down California’s west coast, and into Baja California, Mexico. Both the Columbia Spotted Frog and the Cascades Frog, also part of the Rana genus, reside in the northern regions of this frog’s territory. They show a preference for living in streams and rivers, and lay their eggs in masses...

Malabar Tree Toad, Pedostibes Tuberculosus
2014-09-15 16:22:26

The Malabar Tree Toad, Pedostibes Tuberculosus, is a species of toad located in forests along the Western Ghats of India south of Goa. It is small and it can be found in wet tree hollows or leaf bases that contain water. This slender frog features a moderately sized head with a pointed snout and vertical lores. The distance between the eyes is as wide as the width of the upper eyelid. The opening of the ear is well marked and is about a third of the diameter of the eye. The fingers are...

Golfodulcean Poison Frog, Phyllobates Vittatus
2014-09-12 08:59:50

The Golfodulcean Poison Frog, Phyllobates Vittatus, is a species of frog belonging to the Dendrobatidae family that is native to Costa Rica. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical, moist, lowland forests and rivers. It’s threatened by habitat loss. Like all members of the genus Phyllobates, Golfodulcean Poison Frogs have highly potent neurotoxin alkaloid poisons in their skin. While it’s only the fourth most toxic of the genus, the Golfodulcean Poison Frog is still a highly...

Strawberry Poison Dart Frog, Oophaga Pumilio
2014-09-12 08:52:55

The Strawberry Poison-Dart Frog, Oophaga Pumilio or Dendrobates Pumilio, is a species of small amphibian poison dart frog located in Central America. It’s common throughout its range, which stretches from eastern central Nicaragua through Costa Rica and northwestern Panama. The species is frequently found in humid lowlands and premontane forest, but populations of large size are also found in disturbed areas such as plantations. This frog is perhaps most famous for its widespread varieties...

Golden Poison Frog, Phyllobates Terribilis
2014-09-12 08:44:46

The Golden Poison Frog, Phyllobates Terribilis, known also as the Golden Frog, Golden Poison Arrow Frog or the Golden Dart Frog, is a poison dart frog that is native to the Pacific coast of Colombia. The optimal habitat of this frog is the rainforest with high rain rates, altitudes between 100 and 200 meters, temperatures of at least 26 degrees Celsius, and relative humidity of 80 to 90 percent. While in the wild, this is a social animal, living in groups of up to six individuals; however,...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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