Quantcast

Latest Frog Stories

95d977557dc2df62cf22cf2412179b2a1
2009-08-10 09:35:00

More than 350 new species including the world's smallest deer, a flying frog, a 100 million-year old gecko, and the first new monkey to have been discovered in over a century have been found in the last ten years located in the Eastern Himalayas. Now, climate change threatens this biologically rich habitat. An environmental group says the growing pressures from unsustainable development in the area is confronting the vital habitats of the mountain range spanning across Nepal, China, India,...

2009-07-28 11:15:00

For the first time in nearly 50 years, a population of a nearly extinct frog has been rediscovered in the San Bernardino National Forest's San Jacinto Wilderness. Biologists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessing suitability of sites to re-establish frogs and scientists from the San Diego Natural History Museum retracing a 1908 natural history expedition both rediscovered the rare mountain yellow-legged frog in the San Jacinto Wilderness near Idyllwild, Calif.This re-discovery...

2009-07-27 11:11:41

Dr Amber Teacher, studying a post-doctorate at Royal Holloway, University of London, has discovered evidence that a disease may be causing a behavioral change in frogs. The research, published in the August edition of Molecular Ecology, has unearthed a surprising fact about our long-tongued friends: wild frogs in the UK may be changing their mating behavior.Dr Teacher conducted her research with colleagues from the Institute of Zoology and Queen Mary, University of London. The research...

0798a93de6873f5007cdabf6a2e56bc51
2009-07-25 11:40:00

Scientists have discovered evidence of a practically extinct mountain yellow-legged frog in Southern California, where the amphibian has not been spotted in a half-century. Like other amphibians whose populations continue to decline, the frog was thought to have only about 122 adults in the San Gabriel, San Bernardino and San Jacinto mountain ranges. In June, U.S. Geological Survey biologists and a research team from the San Diego Natural History Museum separately discovered a mountain...

3b1873f3035a2368e0ab749293c002df1
2009-07-13 12:05:00

When it comes to mating, timing is everything for amphibians. Researchers have found that the mating activity of amphibians is synchronized by the full Moon. The fascinating fact that frogs, toads and newts across the globe seem to enjoy mating by moonlight has never before been noticed. It appears that in order to make sure that a sufficient number of males and females join up at the same time, they use the lunar cycle to co-ordinate their gatherings. This proves to be an ingenious...

2009-07-05 22:30:53

California tiger salamanders face a threat from a hybrid relative as well as from over development and pollution, researchers said. Very little development threatened the amphibians 60 years ago when commercial bait sellers in California imported barred tiger salamanders from Texas, a biologist from the University of California Davis told the San Francisco Chronicle. Maureen Ryan of the Center for Population Biology at UC Davis said the larvae of the new salamanders was popular bait, but the...

ba65f312052990902a459a5b111e80311
2009-06-29 10:33:22

A team of researchers has discovered that animals that sleep longer store energy for a long duration of time, something scientists believe could be useful the treatment of obesity and other disorders. In an effort to conserve energy when resources are scarce, some species of animals, like the burrowing frog (Cyclorana alboguttata), go through a period of torpor. These frogs can survive for several years buried in the mud without any food or water. They are able to survive such extended...

2009-05-13 14:00:26

More than 1,000 Chiricahua leopard frog tadpoles are getting a safe start in life in the Phoenix Zoo. Scientists say that in the wild fewer than 100 of the 1,353 tiny tadpoles would be likely to survive through the summer and become frogs, The Arizona Republic reports. Many would be eaten by fish and others left high and dry in waterless ponds. The zoo is participating in a federal and state conservation plan to increase leopard frog numbers. Researchers expect to have hundreds of frogs to...

811a349a52bf38eff53fe94ce72e5cc51
2009-05-11 08:14:11

Research could have implications for addressing hearing loss in humans UCLA scientists report for the first time on the only known frog species that can communicate using purely ultrasonic calls, whose frequencies are too high to be heard by humans. Known as Huia cavitympanum, the frog lives only on the Southeast Asian island of Borneo. Ultrasounds are high-pitched sounds more than 20 kilohertz (kHz) in frequency, which exceeds the upper limit of sounds detectable by humans and is far higher...

9c230ebd384f65f86356ced912cb30e21
2009-05-06 14:26:40

Scientists in Madagascar have discovered more than 200 new species of frogs, but a political crisis is hurting conservation of the Indian Ocean island's unique wildlife, Reuters reported. Researchers said the recent discovery almost doubles the number of known amphibians in Madagascar and suggests conservationists have over-estimated the natural riches that have helped spawn a $390-million-a-year tourism industry. But newer gains in conservation have been compromised after months of...


Latest Frog Reference Libraries

Bleating Tree Frog, Litoria dentata
2014-06-30 14:33:50

The Bleating Tree Frog (Litoria dentata) is a tree frog belonging to the family Hylidae. This frog is native to coastal eastern Australia, from southeastern Queensland, to around Eden, New South Wales. As it is a small frog, it measures up to 45 millimeters long. The dorsal surface of this frog is a dark or pale, rich brown, with broad and irregular bands on each side of the frog starting from the back of the eye. A dark colored stripe extends from the snout, through the eye, and onto the...

Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog, Litoria fallax
2014-05-26 10:53:47

The Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog (Litoria fallax) is a small and very common tree frog located on the eastern coast of Australia, from around Cairns, Queensland, to around Ulladulla, New South Wales. Individuals of this species are often found somewhere else, having been accidentally relocated by transported fruit boxes. Confirmed sightings of breeding pairs have confirmed their survival in Victoria’s cooler climate. This is a small species; the females can reach a maximum size of 25 to 30...

African Red Toad, Schismaderma Carens
2013-11-22 13:31:33

The African Red Toad, Schismaderma Carens, known also as the African Split-Skin Toad, is a species of toad belonging to the family Bufonidae. It’s monotypic within the genus Schismaderma. It is located in Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Kenya, Mozambique, South Africa, Namibia, Swaziland, Zambia, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, and possibly Lesotho. The natural habitats are dry savanna, moist savanna, tropical or subtropical dry shrubland, tropical or subtropical moist...

Argentine Horned Frog, Ceratophrys Ornata
2013-11-22 09:57:33

The Argentine Horned Frog, Ceratophrys Ornata, also known as the Argentine Wide-Mouthed Frog or Pacman frog, is the most common species of Horned frog, located in the rain forests or Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil. As a voracious eater, it will attempt to swallow anything that moves close to its wide mouth, such as insects, lizards, rodents, and other frogs, even if this predator would suffocate in the process. The female frog can grow to be 6.5 inches snout to vent and the males can reach...

Littlejohn’s Tree Frog, Litoria littlejohni
2013-10-09 12:26:27

The Littlejohn’s Tree Frog (Litoria littlejohni), known also as the Heath Frog or the Orange-Bellied Tree Frog, is a species of tree frog that is native to eastern Australia from Wyong, New South Wales, to Buchan, Victoria. Measuring about 60 millimeters in length, this frog is of medium size. It is usually brown or grey-brown on the dorsal surface with many scattered darker colored flecks and spots. Often, a faint darker patch is featured on the back. A dark line extends from behind the...

More Articles (66 articles) »
Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.