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Latest Frogs Stories

2011-05-02 23:49:12

Museum specimens help tell the story Using museum specimens from Mexico, Guatemala and Costa Rica, a team of researchers from San Francisco State University and University of California at Berkeley has documented evidence of a Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) epidemic wave that wiped out native amphibians, according to research to be published on May 3 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (PNAS). More than 40 percent of all amphibian species are currently in decline,...

2011-04-25 16:40:38

Amphibian declines around the world have forced many species to the brink of extinction, are much more complex than realized and have multiple causes that are still not fully understood, researchers conclude in a new report. The search for a single causative factor is often missing the larger picture, they said, and approaches to address the crisis may fail if they don't consider the totality of causes "“ or could even make things worse. No one issue can explain all of the population...

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2010-11-04 06:10:00

A tiny frog, whose body is less than a half-inch long, feeds on toxic mites and releases their poison onto its skin to deter predators from eating it, scientists studying the amphibian reported on Wednesday. The Monte Iberia Eleuth -- Eleutherodactylus iberia -- named after a mountain in Cuba which is its only known habitat, is also only one of five species of frog that share the odd ability to rob toxic alkaloids from their food and exude the compound on to their skin. The micro-frog is...

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2010-05-24 08:26:19

In nature, ultraviolet radiation from sunlight is not the amphibian killer scientists once suspected. Naturally occurring murky water and females who choose to lay their eggs in the shade keep embryos of one of the nation's most UV-sensitive amphibian species out of harm's way most of the time, new research shows. Less than 2 percent of the embryos of the long-toed salamander received lethal doses of UV across 22 breeding sites across nearly 8 square miles (20 square kilometers) in Washington...

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2010-03-01 15:39:37

Challenges evidence that global warming was the cause Scientists broadly agree that global warming may threaten the survival of many plant and animal species; but global warming did not kill the Monteverde golden toad, an often cited example of climate-triggered extinction, says a new study. The toad vanished from Costa Rica's Pacific coastal-mountain cloud forest in the late 1980s, the apparent victim of a pathogen outbreak that has wiped out dozens of other amphibians in the Americas. Many...

2009-11-23 09:45:59

Amphibians like frogs and toads have existed for 360 million years and survived when the dinosaurs didn't, but a new aquatic fungus is threatening to make many of them extinct, according to an article in the November issue of Microbiology Today. The fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd),was found to be associated with waves of amphibian extinctions in Central America and north-eastern Australia in the 1990's. Bd infects over 350 amphibian species by penetrating their skin, but little...

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2009-11-20 07:40:00

Most countries throughout the world participate in the $40-million-per-year culinary trade of frog legs in some way, with 75 percent of frog legs consumed in France, Belgium and the United States. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution and colleagues have found that this trade is a potential carrier of pathogens deadly to amphibians. The team's findings are published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Ecology, Thursday, Nov. 19. Amphibians are rapidly declining worldwide. More than...

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2009-09-23 07:08:03

Sometimes to see something properly, you have to stand farther back. This is true of Chuck Close portraits where a patchwork of many small faces changes into one giant face as you back away. It may also be true of the frogs of Central America, where the pattern of extinctions emerges clearly only at a certain spatial scale. Everyone knows that frogs are in trouble and that some species have disappeared, but a recent analysis of Central American frog surveys shows the situation is worse than...

2009-07-27 11:11:41

Dr Amber Teacher, studying a post-doctorate at Royal Holloway, University of London, has discovered evidence that a disease may be causing a behavioral change in frogs. The research, published in the August edition of Molecular Ecology, has unearthed a surprising fact about our long-tongued friends: wild frogs in the UK may be changing their mating behavior.Dr Teacher conducted her research with colleagues from the Institute of Zoology and Queen Mary, University of London. The research...

2009-05-22 14:39:27

Pollution, climate change, invasive species and habitat destruction are killing Europe's native reptiles and amphibians, wildlife experts said. Fifty-nine percent of all European amphibians and 42 percent of reptiles are declining and face even greater risk than European mammals and birds, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature said. In all, 23 percent of Europe's amphibian species and 21 percent of its reptile species have been classified as threatened and added to the...


Latest Frogs Reference Libraries

Angola River Frog, Amietia angolensis
2013-07-26 11:26:11

The Angola River Frog (Amietia angolensis) known also as the Common River Frog, is a species of frog belonging to the Pyxicephalidae family. It was previously placed in the Ranidae family. It is located in Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Swaziland, South Africa, Zambia, Uganda, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, and possibly Namibia. Its natural habitats are tropical or subtropical moist lowland forests, tropical or subtropical...

Micro Frog, Microbatrachella Capensis
2013-07-16 12:33:22

The Micro Frog (Microbatrachella capensis) is a minute species of frog belonging to the Pyxicephalidae family, in the monotypic genus Microbatrachella. At about .71 inches long, it is one of the smallest regional species. Its color varies from rufous brown with dark mottling, to tan or green, depending on the population. It is native to the south-western Cape area of South Africa, with a single population located on the Cape Flats of Cape Town and a series of populations on the eastern...

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Word of the Day
pungle
  • To take pains; labor assiduously with little progress.
This word comes from the Spanish 'pongale,' put it.
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