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Latest Fruit Stories

Seedless Watermelon Farmers Helped Through Pollenizer Research
2012-10-16 16:53:33

Research from North Carolina State University on flower production and disease resistance in watermelon varieties should help bolster seedless watermelon harvests for farmers. Seedless watermelons are more popular than seeded watermelons, making them a more profitable crop for farmers. But the flowers of seedless watermelon plants must be fertilized with pollen from the male flowers of seeded watermelon plants, because seedless plants do not produce genetically viable pollen. This is a...

2012-10-09 04:02:18

Visitors to the recently redesigned website may also sign up for a free eBook that explains how to grow apples. Douglass, TX (PRWEB) October 08, 2012 Legg Creek Farm, a nursery that provides high quality fruit trees, nut trees, and other types of food-bearing plants to home gardeners and orchard growers across the United States, has just launched a completely re-designed website. The new, more user-friendly site now makes it even easier for customers to learn more about the fruit tree...

Better Bug-resistant Plants With Discovery Of New Gene
2012-09-18 08:08:44

The discovery of a new gene could lead to better bug-resistant plants. Research led by Michigan State University and appearing on the cover of this week´s Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, demonstrates that domestic tomatoes could re-learn a thing or two from their wild cousins. Long-term cultivation has led to tomato crops losing beneficial traits common to wild tomatoes. Anthony Schilmiller, MSU research assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology,...

2012-09-06 23:01:19

Likewise Skincare comments on an article published on http://www.inquirer.net discussing the various foods that can promote skin health, creating beauty from the inside out. Bohemia, NY (PRWEB) September 05, 2012 On September 5th, Likewise Skincare, a moisturizer manufacturer, responds to an article published for the Inquirer Business in regards to which foods can improve the health and look of skin. The article refers to a Telegraph study specifying that skin will appear healthier and more...


Latest Fruit Reference Libraries

Hardy kiwi, Actinidia arguta
2014-01-04 14:34:30

Actinidia arguta is a very hardy, perennial vine species. The plant produces a small fruit that gives the species its common names: Hardy kiwifruit, Kiwi berry, Arctic kiwi, Baby kiwi, Desert kiwi, Grape kiwi, Northern kiwi and Cocktail kiwi. A. arguta is a member of the Actinidiaceae family. The plant can be found growing in Japan, Korea, Northern China and Russian Siberia. A. arguta fruits are edible and don’t require peeling. Its fruit is typically the size of a berry or grape and it...

Davidsonia, Journal
2012-04-25 14:26:44

Davidsonia is a scientific journal published by the University of British Columbia Botanical Garden. It specializes in the botanical natural history of the pacific northwest and horticultural and plant conservation issues. The print edition of Davidsonia existed from 1970 to 1981. It was revived in 2002 as an online journal. The journal provides full open-access to content on its website www.davidsonia.org . The journal is named after British Columbia botanical pioneer John Davidson. It...

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2005-06-23 11:53:34

The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an annual plant in the family Asteraceae. The stem of the flower can grow up to 3 meters tall and the large flower head can reach up to 30cm in diameter. The sunflower is notable for turning to face the Sun, a behavior known as heliotropism. History Sunflowers are native to the Americas, and were domesticated around 1000 B.C. Francisco Pizarro found the Inca subjects venerating the sunflower as an image of their sun god, and gold images of the...

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Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'