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Latest Fullerenes Stories

2014-06-16 18:10:32

University of Southampton Scientists are using a pioneering method of 'caging' and cooling water molecules to study the change in orientation of the magnetic nuclei at the centre of each hydrogen atom - a process which transforms the molecule from one form of water to another. By trapping water molecules in carbon spheres and cooling them, scientists at the universities of Southampton, Nottingham and Columbia University in New York, have been able to follow the change in form (or...

Discovery Could Have A Bearing On Medical Imaging, Cancer Treatment
2013-09-16 08:14:11

Virginia Tech Researchers at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have reported the first experimental evidence that supports the theory that a soccer ball-shaped nanoparticle commonly called a buckyball is the result of a breakdown of larger structures rather than being built atom-by-atom from the ground up. Technically known as fullerenes, these spherical carbon molecules have shown great promise for uses in medicine, solar energy, and optoelectronics. But finding...

Theoretical Possibility Of Large, Hollow Magnetic Cage Molecules Discovered By VCU Physicists
2013-07-31 13:32:46

Virginia Commonwealth University New molecules could be larger than the original Buckminster fullerene with potential applications in technology and health care Virginia Commonwealth University researchers have discovered, in theory, the possibility of creating large, hollow magnetic cage molecules that could one day be used in medicine as a drug delivery system to non-invasively treat tumors, and in other emerging technologies. Approximately 25 years ago, scientists first made the...

2012-12-11 21:43:14

An insight into the properties of fullerene is set to open the door to a new class of electronic acceptors which can be used to build better and cheaper organic solar cells. Organic solar cells have advanced a great deal since they were first invented nearly 20 years ago, but the fullerene component has remained largely the same and this has had a braking effect on the evolution of the technology. But now scientists at the University of Warwick have pinpointed an unappreciated property...

2012-08-21 00:26:39

Scientists have discovered that a space inside a special type of carbon molecule can be used to imprison other smaller molecules such as hydrogen or water. The nano-meter sized cavity of the hollow spherical C60 Buckminsterfullerene – or bucky ball – effectively creates a 'nanolaboratory', allowing detailed study of the quantum mechanical principles that determine the motion of the caged molecule, including the mysterious wave-like behaviour that is a fundamental property of...

2012-04-24 22:44:28

Findings may offer clues to superior performance and guide synthesis of materials with improved properties Detailed studies of one of the best-performing organic photovoltaic materials reveal an unusual bilayer lamellar structure that may help explain the material's superior performance at converting sunlight to electricity and guide the synthesis of new materials with even better properties. The research, published in Nature Communications April 24, 2012, was conducted by scientists at...

Researchers Discover Sold-State Buckyballs In Space
2012-02-22 13:38:19

[ Watch the Video ] For the first time ever, astronomers have discovered buckminsterfullerines existing in a solid form in space, according to a study published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. Ian O'Neill of Discovery News reports that buckminsterfullerines (also known as buckyballs) are "a geodesic molecular ordering of 60 carbon atoms that resemble the domes designed by American architect and inventor Richard Buckminster Fuller." Previously, these...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.