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Latest Functional magnetic resonance imaging Stories

2011-09-22 21:28:51

Machine's magnetic field pushes fluid in the inner ear's balance organ A team of researchers says it has discovered why so many people undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially in newer high-strength machines, get vertigo, or the dizzy sensation of free-falling, while inside or when coming out of the tunnel-like machine. In a new study published in Current Biology online on Sept. 22, a team led by Johns Hopkins scientists suggests that MRI's strong magnet pushes on fluid...

2011-09-22 21:27:22

UC Berkeley researchers decode and reconstruct dynamic visual experiences, in this case Hollywood movie trailers Imagine tapping into the mind of a coma patient, or watching one's own dream on YouTube. With a cutting-edge blend of brain imaging and computer simulation, scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, are bringing these futuristic scenarios within reach. Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and computational models, UC Berkeley researchers have...

2011-09-14 11:42:17

Research conducted by Boston College neuroscientist Sean MacEvoy and colleague Russell Epstein of the University of Pennsylvania finds evidence of a new way of considering how the brain processes and recognizes a person´s surroundings, according to a paper published in the latest issue of Nature Neuroscience. For the study, MacEvoy and Epstein used functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) to help them identify how the brain figures out where it is in the world (scene recognition)....

2011-09-06 12:39:16

Twenty years after the publication of the first human study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)* - a technique to measure activity in the brain through the flow of blood - the Wellcome Trust has published a report providing reflections on the field of human functional brain imaging. The Wellcome Trust report assesses the key developments in human functional brain imaging and examines the role it has played as a funder. Supporting neuroscience research has been a cornerstone...

2011-08-31 14:52:41

In an effort to understand what happens in the brain when a person reads or considers such abstract ideas as love or justice, Princeton researchers have for the first time matched images of brain activity with categories of words related to the concepts a person is thinking about. The results could lead to a better understanding of how people consider meaning and context when reading or thinking. The researchers report in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience that they used...

2011-08-30 15:54:42

New study pinpoints areas of the brain used exclusively for language, providing a partial answer to a longstanding debate in cognitive science New research from MIT suggests that there are parts of our brain dedicated to language and only language, a finding that marks a major advance in the search for brain regions specialized for sophisticated mental functions. Functional specificity, as it's known to cognitive scientists, refers to the idea that discrete parts of the brain handle...

2011-08-17 23:55:51

Every day we make thousands of tiny predictions "” when the bus will arrive, who is knocking on the door, whether the dropped glass will break. Now, in one of the first studies of its kind, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis are beginning to unravel the process by which the brain makes these everyday prognostications. While this might sound like a boon to day traders, coaches and gypsy fortune tellers, people with early stages of neurological diseases such as...

2011-07-26 12:11:40

A new study has found that patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) exhibit abnormal functional connectivity in the thalamus, a centrally located relay station for transmitting information throughout the brain. The results of the study appear online in the journal Radiology. "Using resting-state functional MRI, we found increased functional connectivity of thalamocortical networks in patients following MTBI, due to the subtle injury of the thalamus," said study co-author Yulin Ge,...

2011-07-05 07:03:04

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Babies' brains are already specially attuned to the sounds of human voices and emotions, according to this study. Three- to seven-month-old infants showed more activation in a part of the brain when they heard emotionally neutral human sounds, such as coughing, sneezing, or yawning, than when they heard the familiar sounds of toys or water. That activity appeared in an area of the temporal lobe known in adults for its role in processing human vocalizations. The babies...


Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.