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Latest Functional magnetic resonance imaging Stories

2011-04-27 23:37:39

A new study uses creative engineering to unravel brain mechanisms associated with one of the most fundamental subjective human feelings: self-consciousness. The research, published by Cell Press in the April 28 issue of the journal Neuron, identifies a brain region called the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) as being critical for the feeling of being an entity localized at a particular position in space and for perceiving the world from this position and perspective. Recent theories of...

2011-04-18 12:21:51

    * Alcohol dependence (AD) is strongly associated with impaired impulse control.    * A new study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine impulsive choices among people with a range of alcohol use disorders (AUDs).    * Findings suggest that impulsive choice in AD may be the result of functional anomalies in widely distributed but interconnected brain regions that are involved in cognitive and emotional control. Researchers...

2011-04-08 15:32:06

As humans face increasing distractions in their personal and professional lives, University of British Columbia researchers have discovered that people can gain greater control over their thoughts with real-time brain feedback. The study is the world's first investigation of how real-time functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) feedback from the brain region responsible for higher-order thoughts, including introspection, affects our ability to control these thoughts. The researchers find...

2011-03-30 07:58:18

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Physical pain and intense feelings of social rejection "hurt" in the same way, according to this study. The study shows that the same regions of the brain that become active in response to painful sensory experiences are activated during intense experiences of social rejection. "These results give new meaning to the idea that social rejection 'hurts'," University of Michigan social psychologist Ethan Kross, lead author of the study, was quoted as saying. "On the surface,...

2011-03-28 22:45:13

Physical pain and intense feelings of social rejection "hurt" in the same way, a new study shows. The study demonstrates that the same regions of the brain that become active in response to painful sensory experiences are activated during intense experiences of social rejection. "These results give new meaning to the idea that social rejection 'hurts'," said University of Michigan social psychologist Ethan Kross, lead author of the article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy...

2011-03-28 21:55:43

Mathematical Sequence Strengthens fMRI Data, Penn Study Shows By combining sophisticated mathematical techniques more commonly used by spies instead of scientists with the power and versatility of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a Penn neurologist has developed a new approach for studying the inner workings of the brain. A hidden pattern is encoded in the seemingly random order of things presented to a human subject, which the brain reveals when observed with fMRI. The research...

2011-03-09 16:00:19

Scans with fMRI show areas in brain that change in response to emotions as children enter adolescence Just when children are faced with intensifying peer pressure to misbehave, regions of the brain are actually blossoming in a way that heighten the ability to resist risky behavior, report researchers at three West Coast institutions. The findings -- detailed in the March 10 issue of the journal Neuron -- may give parents a sigh of relief regarding their kids as they enter adolescence and pay...

2011-02-25 13:19:21

Study uses fMRI scans to attempt communication with severely brain-injured patients, suggests cognitive functioning may not be recognized at bedside Using a sophisticated imaging test to probe for higher-level cognitive functioning in severely brain-injured patients provides a window into consciousness -- but the view it presents is one that is blurred in fascinating ways, say researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College in the Feb. 25 online edition of the journal Brain. In a novel study of...

2011-02-23 01:38:25

The Stripe of Gennari develops even in those who are blind from birth and does not degenerate, despite a lack of visual input. This was discovered by Robert Trampel and colleagues from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences using magnetic resonance imaging. This bundle of nerve fibers, which is approximately 0.3 mm thick, is not exclusively responsible for optic information. In the blind, it might play a greater role in processing tactile stimuli. This could...

2011-02-20 21:47:44

According to University of Toronto speech-language pathologist Luc De Nil, the beat could be revealing such things as how children master one of the most complex tasks of all "“ speech. "The rapid and precise muscle movements of speech must be the most intricate, yet poorly understood, of all the sensory-motor skills," says De Nil. De Nil's interest in finger-tapping came out of his group's previous work on adults who stutter. His team discovered that they have problems in acquiring new...


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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