Quantcast

Latest Functional magnetic resonance imaging Stories

Confidence Starts In The Brain
2012-12-10 05:31:59

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online If it seems as though some people are more confident in the decisions that they make than others, it's because of differences in how their brains are wired, a team of UK researchers have discovered. Writing in the journal Nature Neuroscience, Professor Ray Dolan and colleagues from the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London (UCL) have pinpointed the specific regions of the brain that work together to...

Visual Sensitivity Improved By Learning To Control Brain Activity
2012-12-05 15:46:31

Wellcome Trust Training human volunteers to control their own brain activity in precise areas of the brain can enhance fundamental aspects of their visual sensitivity, according to a new study. This non-invasive 'neurofeedback' approach could one day be used to improve brain function in patients with abnormal patterns of activity, for example stroke patients. Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at UCL used non-invasive, real-time brain imaging that enabled...

2012-11-21 15:27:25

MRI shows changes in the brains of people with post-concussion syndrome (PCS), according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. Researchers hope the results point the way to improved detection and treatment for the disorder. PCS affects approximately 20 percent to 30 percent of people who suffer mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI)–defined by the World Health Organization as a traumatic event causing brief loss of consciousness and/or transient memory dysfunction or...

Brain Waves Translated Into Music
2012-11-15 21:48:46

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Chinese researchers at the University of Electronic Science and Technology in Chengdu, China have developed a method to transform brain waves into music that closely resembles something a human composer would write. According to their report in the open access journal PLOS ONE, they were able to use an electroencephalogram (EEG) to create the pitch and duration of a note, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to...

Supercomputer Simulations Of Blast Waves On The Brain Studied To Improve Helmets
2012-11-15 12:46:32

Sandia National Laboratories Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico are comparing supercomputer simulations of blast waves on the brain with clinical studies of veterans suffering from mild traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) to help improve helmet designs. Paul Taylor and John Ludwigsen of Sandia´s Terminal Ballistics Technology Department and Corey Ford, a neurologist at UNM´s Health Sciences Center, are in the final year of a four-year...

Brain Scans Show Some Head Trauma Patients Are Still Aware
2012-11-14 05:47:15

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Alex Seaman is 20 years old, and for the last year and a half, he's been a patient at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability. He is awake and even has his eyes open at times, but Alex has no apparent awareness and is unable to talk or respond with his body. Alex suffered a severe head injury last April. He had been out celebrating a friend's 18th birthday and missed his bus stop. The bus was still moving when he jumped off and hit...

How The Brain Affects Quick Judgments In Social Settings
2012-11-13 12:51:09

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online We make snap judgments about other people all the time, whether we like to admit it or not. In speed dating, this is especially true because we are deciding someone's romantic potential in relatively few seconds. How we make those fast decisions is not very well understood, however. A research team from the California Institute of Technology (CALTECH) and Trinity College, Dublin has found that people make such speed-dating...

Meditation Has Lasting Emotional Benefits Says Study
2012-11-13 11:30:10

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Meditation has been part of the human experience for at least 5,000 years. Our first written records of the ancient art are found in Indian scriptures, called tantras. Around 2,500 years ago, Siddhartha Gautma, commonly called Buddha, began teaching meditation as a road to enlightenment. However, it wasn´t until the 1960s that Western professors and researchers began studying the effects of mediation in earnest. Participating in...

Math Can Really Hurt
2012-11-02 04:01:41

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Some lucky people have a proclivity for number crunching and difficult equations, but for many of us the idea of performing complex calculations is more horrifying than a Friday the 13th movie marathon. And, like Jason Voorhees´ two-foot machete plunging into his victim´s abdomen – the personal anxiety surrounding an impending math exam can actually cause people to feel physical pain, according to new research from the...

Human Brain Can Only Process So Much Information At Once
2012-10-31 05:07:15

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Even the most intelligent, complex brains can be taken by a swindler's story, a new study from Case Western Reserve University shows, even stories that prove false upon a second look. The new study, published online in the journal NeuroImage, reveals that when the brain fires up the network of neurons that allows a person to empathize, the network used for analysis is suppressed. Our ability to appreciate the human cost of our action...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
Related