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Latest Functional neuroimaging Stories

Hot Flashes In Menopause Have Neural Origins
2013-07-16 05:05:07

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For the first time in years, neuroscientists from Wayne State University School of Medicine have provided novel insights into the neural origins of hot flashes in menopausal women. The study, published in Cerebral Cortex, might inform and eventually lead to new treatments for women experiencing the sudden but temporary episodes of body warmth, flushing and sweating. "The idea of understanding brain responses during thermoregulatory...

The Impact Of fMRI Over The Past 20 Years
2013-01-17 06:07:29

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new study published in the January edition of the Perspectives of Psychological Science reveals the impact of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) over the last 20 years, and argues that there are some issues that remain unclear. To begin, fMRI has been used to evaluate real-time brain activity. The tool can determine changes in blood flow and help researchers better understand the human brain. Past studies at...

2011-05-31 06:46:23

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- New clues to the mystery of brain function, obtained through research by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine, suggest that distinct mental states can be distinguished based on unique patterns of activity in coordinated "networks" within the brain. These networks consist of brain regions that are synchronously communicating with one another. The Stanford team is using this network approach to develop diagnostic tests in Alzheimer's disease and other...

2011-05-26 19:00:00

BEIJING, May 26, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- In a ceremony today, the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) announced a collaboration agreement with the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) to develop a joint Center of Excellence in Brain Mapping for the purpose of collaborative research and education in neuroimaging. In addition, Penn President Amy Gutmann and Chinese Academy of Sciences Vice President Li Jiayang signed an MOU to establish a cooperative research relationship and to...

2011-02-08 13:29:14

The human brain operates as a highly interconnected small-world network, not as a collection of discrete regions as previously believed, with important implications for why many of us experience cognitive declines in old age, a new study shows. Australian researchers have mapped the brain's neural networks and for the first time linked them with specific cognitive functions, such as information processing and language. Results from the study are published in the prestigious Journal of...

2011-01-18 18:58:51

Over the last few years, researchers have used a type of brain scanning, known as functional magnetic resonance imaging fMRI, to help them map changes in blood flow in the brain and to correlate this with thoughts and behavior. A new way to analyze fMRI data, which could improve is reported in the International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design. Scientists have known since the 1890s that changes in blood flow and blood oxygenation in the brain (hemodynamics) are correlated with...

2010-12-08 22:02:07

Neuroimaging: Voodoo, New Phrenology, or Scientific Breakthrough? Introduction to Special Section on fMRI Ed Diener In response to the widespread interest following the publication of Vul et al (2009), Perspectives Editor Ed Diener invited researchers to contribute articles for a special section on fMRI, discussing the promises and issues facing neuroimaging. Mistreating Psychology in the Decades of the Brain Gregory A. Miller Scientists tend to consider psychology-biology relationships in...

2009-11-03 12:36:01

A study published this week in PNAS provides a comprehensive comparative functional anatomy study in human and monkey brains which reveals highly similar brain networks preserved across evolution. An international collaboration co-led by scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City examined patterns of connectivity to show that the precuneus, long thought to be a single structure, is actually divided into four distinct functional regions. These areas were identified using...

2009-08-04 12:01:43

Ready"¦ go! That phrase not only gets your muscles pumping but also starts blood flowing to the appropriate places in the brain. However, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine found that while measurements of electrical activity showed peaks in the "ready" or anticipatory phase, the blood flow in the brain measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) didn't start until "go." The results could have application in some mental disorders such as schizophrenia."Your brain is...

2009-04-08 08:35:00

You've often heard people ask, "Where is the wisdom?" University of California San Diego researchers wanted to know where the wisdom is literally "“ in the brain. Their study reviewed the medical literature on brain studies aimed at pinpointing various areas involved in wise thinking. Most used functional neuroimaging studies to gauge changes in blood flow, metabolism, and other factors as people thought about specific things related to wisdom, such as a situation calling for altruism...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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