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3a9497a3b842e4ed48905b25533409c81
2010-05-11 08:10:00

Scientists have unraveled the dynamics of a deadly disease that is wiping out amphibian populations across the globe. New findings, published May 10 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest that infection intensity -- the severity of the disease among individuals -- determines whether frog populations will survive or succumb to an amphibian fungal disease called Chytridiomycosis. The research identifies a dangerous tipping point in infection intensity, beyond which...

2e07fb50f2f3f1ad0fb7181540d977171
2010-05-05 12:25:04

Of all the things that might control the onset of disease epidemics in Michigan lakes, the shape of the lakes' bottoms might seem unlikely. But that is precisely the case, and a new BioScience report by scientists from Indiana University Bloomington and four other institutions explains why. "In the paper, we go through several explanations for what is going on," said IU Bloomington biologist Spencer Hall, the report's lead author. "We are looking at the zooplankton that is infected, the fish...

af8b1d303e2cf5a07407a550449b04131
2010-04-30 06:18:52

These insect pests pioneered new frontiers in genetics Contrary to popular belief, aphids are not just sap-sucking, plant-destroying enemies of agriculture. In fact, these pests are genetic pioneers that evolved two unique traits, according to a study that appears in the April 30 issue of the journal Science. First, aphids are, so far, the only animal known to produce essential pigments known as carotenoids. The aphid's pigment-producing ability is unique to the animal kingdom. Other...

4886f3930e0b69e4cd14eff6a8df17d71
2010-04-23 06:15:00

Researchers reported Thursday that a possibly deadly fungus is spreading among people and animals throughout the northwestern United States and parts of western Canada. According to researchers, Cryptococcus gattii usually only infects people with compromised immune systems, such as persons with AIDS and those who have had transplants, but they say the new strain is genetically different. C. gattii is "worrisome because it appears to be a threat to otherwise healthy people," said Edmond...

2010-04-20 00:02:00

SINGAPORE, April 20 /PRNewswire/ -- Over the next five years, technological advancements in therapeutics are expected to amplify the number of patients diagnosed with systemic fungal infection (SFI) in Thailand. The significant increase in number of patients is shifting the focus of managing SFI from empiric and prophylactic methods to targeted and pre-emptive treatment. (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081117/FSLOGO) New analysis from Frost & Sullivan...

5e4a651fc0a8fe5281c94d4a8eb222311
2010-04-15 07:13:22

A tumor-causing maize fungus with the unsavory-sounding name "corn smut" wields different weapons from its genetic arsenal depending on which part of the plant it infects. The discovery by Stanford researchers marks the first time tissue-specific targeting has been found in a pathogen. The finding upends conventional notions of how pathogens attack and could point the way to new approaches to fighting disease not only in plants but also in people, according to Stanford researchers. Corn smut...

cda1005f261f5ba111d7150b6fb23b49
2010-04-06 07:05:00

Highly dangerous Cryptococcus fungi love sugar and will consume it anywhere because it helps them reproduce. In particular, they thrive on a sugar called inositol which is abundant in the human brain and spinal cord. To borrow inositol from a person's brain, the fungi have an expanded set of genes that encode for sugar transporter molecules. While a typical fungus has just two such genes, Cryptococcus have almost a dozen, according to Joseph Heitman, M.D., Ph.D., chairman of the Duke...

2010-03-17 16:30:06

CORVALLIS, Ore. "“ Fungi have significant potential for "horizontal" gene transfer, a new study has shown, similar to the mechanisms that allow bacteria to evolve so quickly, become resistant to antibiotics and cause other serious problems. This discovery, to be published Thursday in the journal Nature, suggests that fungi have the capacity to rapidly change the make-up of their genomes and become infectious to plants and possibly animals, including humans. They are not nearly as...

2010-03-15 15:54:31

Six-year study examines impacts of fescue and symbiotic fungus The popular forage and turf grass called tall fescue covers a vast amount of land in the U.S. -- an area that's estimated to be larger than Virginia and Maryland combined -- and a new study by ecologists at Rice University and Indiana University suggests there is more to fescue than meets the eye. Results of the six-year study, which are available online in the Journal of Applied Ecology, show that a symbiotic fungus living inside...

67ca60da81ab3bc6747b684ca7a11951
2010-03-01 07:43:18

Digger wasp larvae use bacteria against infections Digger wasps of the genus Philanthus, so-called beewolves, house beneficial bacteria on their cocoons that guarantee protection against harmful microorganisms. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena teamed up with researchers at the University of Regensburg and the Jena Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research "“ Hans-Knoell-Institute - and discovered that bacteria of the genus Streptomyces produce a...


Latest Fungus Reference Libraries

0_0bd3abc6102cfbf910539daa5d26705d
2005-09-07 18:11:11

Leafcutter ants are found in warmer regions of Central and South America. These remarkable social insects have evolved an advanced agricultural system. They feed on a specialized fungus that grows only in the underground chambers of the ants' nest. The ants actively cultivate their fungus, feeding it with freshly-cut vegetation and maintaining it free from pests and weeds. This is done by a symbiotic relationship with a colony of bacteria that grows on the ants that protect the fungus. The...

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Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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