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Latest Fungus Stories

2011-12-22 12:24:56

In a major effort to speed up the process of officially recognizing new plant species, botanists will no longer be required to provide Latin descriptions of new species, and publication in online academic journals and books will be considered as valid as print publication. The new rules, which were approved at a nomenclature conference held in conjunction with the International Botanical Congress in July, become effective January 1, 2012. They overturn longstanding historical requirements...

What's That Lurking In Your Bathroom Sink?
2011-12-22 04:53:55

A study examining the prevalence of the fungus Fusarium in bathroom sink drains suggests that plumbing systems may be a common source of human infections. In the first extensive survey of its kind, researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences sampled nearly 500 sink drains from 131 buildings -- businesses, homes, university dormitories and public facilities -- in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and California. They...

2011-12-21 13:05:19

From improving food security to their use as biotechnology power horses, Trichoderma fungi are increasingly being exploited by industry. Current advances in the field are brought together and highlighted in a special issue of Microbiology published online on 27 December. Trichoderma are free-living fungi widely used in agricultural biotechnology. Some species of Trichoderma are specifically used as biocontrol agents to control plant pathogens including Fusarium species. Their success is...

2011-12-09 11:43:55

Discovery could lead to improved disease resistance in food crops Researchers at the University of Missouri have found a key process in a plant's immune system response that may help future crops fight off dangerous diseases. "We study how Arabidopsis, a common weed related to the mustard plant, fends off infectious agents," said Walter Gassmann, professor of plant sciences and researcher for the Christopher S. Bond Life Sciences Center and Interdisciplinary Plant Group. "We have...

2011-11-28 23:09:15

Fungi and bacteria help one another stay mobile, say TAU researchers Bacteria and fungi are remarkably mobile. Now researchers at Tel Aviv University have discovered that the two organisms enjoy a mutually beneficial relationship to aid them in that movement – and their survival. Fungal spores can attach themselves to bacteria, "hitching a ride" wherever the bacteria travel. And while this allows them to travel further than they would on their own, says Prof. Eshel Ben-Jacob of...

2011-11-14 23:07:46

Laser capture microdissection provides an insight into the symbiotic program of root cells Not only mineral oil and petroleum gas, also phosphorous is a scarce resource. According to well-respected scientists who gathered together for a conference in Cambridge this August, we will face significant problems relating to phosphorous deficiency in just 20 years from now. Phosphorous, this important and essential mineral, is part of our DNA and, therefore, irreplaceable. Many soils are already...

New Species Of Fungus Found In A Wasp Nest
2011-11-10 04:29:58

Mucor nidicola species previously unknown to science While some researchers look for new species in such exotic places as the deep sea, tropical regions, or extreme environments, a team headed by Tufts researchers turned their attention towards nests of an invasive paper wasp. What they found was a new species of fungus. Philip T. Starks, associate professor of biology at the School of Arts and Sciences at Tufts University, and doctoral student Anne A. Madden published their discovery...

Frog Fungus Spread Throughout The World Via Trade
2011-11-09 13:06:06

According to new research, a killer frog fungus that is spreading around the world is being distributed through amphibian trade by zoos and collectors. Scientists said that the most widespread and lethal form of the three distinct lineages of the chytrid fungus was probably created by a crossing of two prior forms. Chytrid is now found on every continent and has wiped out a number of species. The fungus kills amphibians by blocking the transfer of vital substances through their...

2011-11-08 10:31:32

A 79-year-old collection of fungal cultures and the U.S. Forest Service's Northern Research Stationare part of a team that will sequence 1,000 fungal genomes in the next 5 years. Dan Lindner, a research plant pathologist with the Northern Research Station's Center for Forest Mycology Research (CFMR), is one of 13 scientists participating in the '1000 Fungal Genomes' project, which in collaboration with the Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute will sequence two species from...

Researcher Links Fungus To Dropping Bat Population
2011-10-31 13:21:51

A University of Tennessee researcher helped confirm the link between the fungus Geomyces destructans and the dropping bat population. Over a million bats were killed in North American in 2006, and little has been done to try and save them due to lack of evidence for the alleged killer. However, a new study has discovered that the fungus Geomyces destructans is the agent of White-noise Syndrome (WNS), which is the fungal disease decimating the bat population. The fungus has been...


Latest Fungus Reference Libraries

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2005-09-07 18:11:11

Leafcutter ants are found in warmer regions of Central and South America. These remarkable social insects have evolved an advanced agricultural system. They feed on a specialized fungus that grows only in the underground chambers of the ants' nest. The ants actively cultivate their fungus, feeding it with freshly-cut vegetation and maintaining it free from pests and weeds. This is done by a symbiotic relationship with a colony of bacteria that grows on the ants that protect the fungus. The...

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Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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