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Latest Fusiform gyrus Stories

Scientists Find How Our Brains Recognize Faces
2012-01-10 12:43:24

A new study by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) shines new light on how the human brain can recognize faces, as well as how it can discern actual faces from face-like images or objects. According to an MIT press release, our minds are often able to see things that resemble faces, such as the New Hampshire's "Old Man of the Mountain." Yet at the same time, rarely do we have difficulty telling the difference between these and actual faces, and Professor of Brain and Cognitive...

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2010-07-29 09:53:10

The trouble may be in your neurons, TAU's "Face Lab" discovers A specific area in our brains is responsible for processing information about human and animal faces, both how we recognize them and how we interpret facial expressions. Now, Tel Aviv University research is exploring what makes this highly specialized part of the brain unique, a first step to finding practical applications for that information. In her "Face Lab" at Tel Aviv University, Dr. Galit Yovel of TAU's Department of...

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2010-02-25 11:09:01

Two Spanish psychologists and a German neurologist have recently shown that the brain that activates when a person learns a new noun is different from the part used when a verb is learnt. The scientists observed this using brain images taken using functional magnetic resonance, according to an article they have published this month in the journal Neuroimage. "Learning nouns activates the left fusiform gyrus, while learning verbs switches on other regions (the left inferior frontal gyrus and...

2009-04-28 11:25:29

Most people are expert readers, but it is something of an enigma that our brain can achieve expertise in such a recent cultural invention, which lies at the interface between vision and language. Given that the first alphabetic scripts are thought to have been invented only around four to five thousand years it is unlikely that enough time has elapsed to allow the evolution of specialized parts of the brain for reading. While neuroimaging techniques have made some progress in understanding...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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