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Latest G. Caleb Alexander Stories

Opioid Prescriptions Nearly Double
2013-09-16 11:11:23

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online More research has been released this week which examines the extent of America’s growing addiction to opioid painkillers. In the last three weeks two studies have been published highlighting this disturbing trend and warning of the dangers therein. A study published last week found that the number of opioid prescriptions for non-cancer pain has almost doubled in the past decade. What’s more, prescriptions for non-opioid...

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2009-11-20 14:37:24

First study to quantify savings Purchasing prescription drugs in a three-month supply rather than a one-month supply has long been regarded as a way to reduce the cost of drugs for patients and third-party payers. New research from the University of Chicago quantifies the savings for the first time. An analysis of 26,852 prescriptions filled for 395 different drugs from 2000-2005 showed that patients who purchased their drugs in three-month supplies rather than with one-month supplies saved...

2009-08-27 07:35:50

A number of physicians erroneously believed that certain off-label uses of prescription drugs were approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), according to a recent national survey. "Off-label use" refers to prescribing a drug for a purpose outside the scope of a drug's approved label. The FDA makes it clear that they regulate the marketing of prescription drugs, not prescribing. The agency approves drugs for marketing with an official "label" that stipulates an indication, dose,...

2009-08-24 18:11:00

Some physicians erroneously think certain off-label uses of prescription drugs are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, researchers said. Corresponding author Dr. G. Caleb Alexander of the University of Chicago Medical Center said this mistaken belief could encourage doctors to prescribe the drugs, despite the lack of scientific evidence supporting such use. The FDA approves drugs for marketing with an official label that stipulates an indication, dose, intended population,...

2009-08-21 08:31:54

Physicians lack knowledge of off-label drug use and FDA approval statusIn a recent national survey, a substantial minority of physicians erroneously believed that certain off-label uses of prescription drugs were approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This mistaken belief could encourage them to prescribe these drugs, despite the lack of scientific evidence supporting such use."Off-label prescribing is common, but researchers have not always known why. Our research shows that some...

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2008-03-24 13:40:00

Following free drug sample receipt, patients who receive these samples have significantly higher out-of-pocket prescription costs than those who don't, according to the first study to look at the out-of-pocket cost associated with free-sample use, published in the March 24, 2008, issue of Medical Care.Patients who never received samples had estimated out-of-pocket prescription costs of $178 over six months. Patients who received samples spent an estimated $166 for a six-month period prior to...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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