Quantcast

Latest G protein Stories

2014-06-30 04:21:39

LONDON and BOSTON, June 30, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Heptares Therapeutics, the leading GPCR structure-guided drug discovery and development company, is delighted to announce that Fiona Marshall, Heptares' Chief Scientific Officer and co-founder, has been invited to present at the Royal Society of Medicine Medical Innovations Summit. The event, which takes place on Saturday 5 July 2014 at The Royal Society of Medicine in London, UK, will feature presentations on pioneering...

2014-06-23 13:34:53

Duke University Medical Center A team of scientists from Duke Medicine, the University of Michigan and Stanford University has determined the underlying architecture of a cellular signaling complex involved in the body's response to stimuli such as light and pain. This complex, consisting of a human cell surface receptor and its regulatory protein, reveals a two-step mechanism that has been hypothesized previously but not directly documented. The findings, reported on June 22, 2014,...

Heart Attack Patients May Soon Have Side Effect-Free Drug Option
2014-03-12 06:36:52

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new drug designed to stop a heart attack in its tracks, while reducing the damage caused, all without side effects, is one step closer to development thanks to a group of Melbourne scientists from Monash University. New hope for thousands of people who experience heart attacks and heart failure is provided by the study, published in a recent issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. A team of scientists, led by...

Detailed Picture Of Protein Linked To Learning, Pain And Brain Disorders Created By Scientists
2014-03-07 11:26:29

Scripps Research Institute Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and Vanderbilt University have created the most detailed 3-D picture yet of a membrane protein that is linked to learning, memory, anxiety, pain and brain disorders such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and autism. "This receptor family is an exciting new target for future medicines for treatment of brain disorders," said P. Jeffrey Conn, PhD, Lee E. Limbird Professor of Pharmacology and director...

2013-07-16 15:42:18

Brandeis scientists bring us a step closer to understanding how to control cancer cells without harming healthy ones The nasty side effects of radiation and chemotherapy are well known: fatigue, hair loss and nausea, to name a few. Cancer treatment can seem as harsh as the disease because it can't differentiate healthy cells from cancerous cells, killing both. But what if there were a way to control or stop the growth of cancer cells without harming other cells? Brandeis biologist...

2013-04-22 22:29:32

A three-dimensional image of one of the proteins that serves as an on-off switch as it binds to receptors on the surface of a cell suggests there may be a sort of main power switch that could be tripped. These surface receptors are responsible for helping cells discern light, set the heart racing, or detect pain. The finding, published online April 21, 2013, in the journal Nature by a research collaboration involving this year's Nobel laureates in chemistry, could help in the development...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
Related