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Latest Galveston, Texas Stories

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2008-10-06 09:15:00

By James C. McKinley Jr. Jerrith Baird last spoke to his grandmother by telephone the night Hurricane Ike swept away most of the houses on this narrow spit of land. The grandmother, Jennifer McLemore, 58, who worked at a local hospital, had holed up with her dog in a newly built beach house on stilts. She giggled with nervous fear, as she described to her grandson how three neighboring houses were being carried away in a flood, along with a trailer home she owned. Then her cell phone went...

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2008-10-03 12:15:00

3 decades of data point to troubling century ahead for Gulf bays The most comprehensive geological review ever undertaken of the upper U.S. Gulf Coast suggests that a combination of rising seas and dammed rivers could flood large swaths of wetlands this century in one or more bays from Alabama to Texas. "In terms of sea-level increases and river sediments flowing into the bays, we're rapidly approaching a time when bays will face conditions they last saw in the Holocene, from about 9,600...

2008-10-01 15:00:21

Ecologists said they fear Hurricane Ike did extensive damage to Gulf Coast beaches and wildlife habitat that could take years to repair. While the storm didn't produce any significant oil spills, it did knock over trees, inundate marshes with salt water and washed tons of debris into the Gulf of Mexico and Galveston Bay. "The extent of the damage won't be known for a while but it is possible we have had 20-30 years of damage at once," Larry McKinney, executive director of the Harte...

2008-09-28 15:00:21

Four hundred people are still listed as missing in the wake of Hurricane Ike, with more than 200 of them from Galveston Island, Texas, officials say. Sixty of the missing lived on the hard-hit Bolivar Peninsula, a Gulf of Mexico beachfront community. One of them, 58-year-old Gail Ettenger, was found dead late last week miles away in a remote, mosquito-ridden marsh, The Houston Chronicle reported Sunday. Since Hurricane Ike hit Sept. 12, more than 140 Texas who had been missing have been...

2008-09-28 15:00:21

By LAUREN KING By Lauren King The Virginian-Pilot NORFOLK When Seaman Daniel Miles first flew into Galveston, Texas, from his ship a week ago, he didn't see the damage from Hurricane Ike that was depicted in news reports. "Up top, everything looked OK," he said Saturday, upon returning to Norfolk Naval Station. "Once we got down on the ground, we saw the water damage." Miles, and more than 1,000 sailors and Marines aboard the Norfolk- based amphibious assault ship Nassau, soon...

2008-09-28 15:00:21

By Amanda Milkovits "I've been to a lot of hurricanes, and this is the worst I've ever seen," says Brooke Lawrence, of West Greenwich. Joanne Ramsey inched the emergency response vehicle down roads narrowed by hurricane-strewn debris and looked for survivors of Hurricane Ike along the coast of Texas. Behind the driver's seat, there were tubs filled with baked beans, sausages, apples, peaches and cookies. People from a Southern Baptist church in North Carolina had made the meals under...

2008-09-28 12:00:22

By JUAN A LOZANO CUTLINES Gina Hadley sifts through her destroyed home in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike on Wednesday in Galveston, Texas. Residents were allowed to return to the island Wednesday. David J. Phillip/Associated Press People are warned not to go in without tetanus shots -- or rat bait. GALVESTON, Texas -- Ten days after Hurricane Ike, this devastated beach town reopened to residents Wednesday with stern warnings about what still lurks on the island -- rotting cattle...

2008-09-26 00:00:18

By The Associated Press GALVESTON, Texas (AP) - Ten days after Hurricane Ike, this devastated beach town reopened to residents Wednesday with stern warnings about what still lurks on the island - rotting cattle carcasses, snakes and swarms of mosquitoes - and what isn't there: drinking water, reliable electricity, medical care or sewer service.After spending hours in traffic that backed up for 10 miles, some residents found their homes in ruins."I wasn't prepared for this," taxi driver...

2008-09-25 09:00:30

By JUAN A LOZANO By Juan A. Lozano The Associated Press GALVESTON, Texas Ten days after Hurricane Ike, this devastated beach city reopened to residents Wednesday with stern warnings about what still lurks on the island - rotting cattle carcasses, snakes and swarms of mosquitoes - and what isn't there: drinking water, reliable electricity, medical care or sewer service. After spending hours in traffic that backed up for 10 miles, some residents found their homes in ruins. "I...

2008-09-25 09:00:30

By Juan A. Lozano Associated Press GALVESTON, Texas -- Ten days after Hurricane Ike, this devastated beach town reopened to residents Wednesday with stern warnings about what still lurks on the island -- rotting cattle carcasses, snakes and swarms of mosquitoes -- and what isn't there: drinking water, reliable electricity, medical care or sewer service. After spending hours in traffic that backed up for 10 miles, some residents found their homes in ruins. "I wasn't prepared for this,"...