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Latest Gamma-Aminobutyric acid Stories

2011-11-03 07:09:00

NEW YORK, November 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Impulsive individuals tend to display aggressive behavior and have challenges ranging from drug and alcohol abuse, to problem gambling and difficult relationships. They are less able to adapt to different social situations. Impulsivity is also a common feature of psychiatric disorders. New research in Biological Psychiatry shows that people may react this way, in part, because they have lower levels of GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid),...

2011-09-21 19:44:41

20 mouse lines provide views of cortical GABA neurons not previously possible A team of neuroscientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has succeeded in creating what amounts to a GPS system for locating and tracking a vital class of brain cells that until now has eluded comprehensive identification, particularly in living animals. The cells in question are the class of neurons that release the neurotransmitter called GABA (gamma aminobutyric acid). GABA neurons function to...

2011-09-16 11:37:26

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have discovered molecular-level changes in the brains of women with major depressive disorder that link two hypotheses of the biological mechanisms that lead to the illness. Their results, published online this week in Molecular Psychiatry, also allowed them to recreate the changes in a mouse model that could enhance future research on depression. Although women are twice as likely as men to develop depression and have more...

2011-07-13 23:31:09

Scientists have known for some time that the hormone leptin acts in the brain to prevent obesity, but the specific underlying neurocircuitry has remained a mystery. Now, new research published by Cell Press in the July 14 issue of the journal Neuron reveals neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie the antiobesity effects of leptin. "Leptin is a hormone that is secreted by fat cells and acts at its receptor in the brain to decrease food intake and promote energy expenditure," explains...

2011-03-08 07:42:32

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ If you usually have a hard time picking up the latest dance moves or learning to play a new piano piece, it could be due to a lack of GABA, a chemical messenger in the brain. People who are fast to learn a simple sequence of finger motions are also those whose brains show large changes in GABA following electrical stimulation. GABA is important for the plasticity of the morot cortex, a brain region involved in planning, control, and execution of voluntary...

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2011-03-01 09:31:56

Discovery could lead to new therapies for alcoholism University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers have identified two genes associated with binge drinking that may open doors to new, more effective treatments for excessive alcohol drinking. The scientists found that manipulating two receptors in the brain, GABA receptors and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), "caused profound reduction" of binge drinking for two weeks in rodents that had been bred and trained to drink excessively. The...

2011-02-28 15:00:00

Discovery Could Lead to New Therapies for Alcoholism BALTIMORE, Feb. 28, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- University of Maryland School of Medicine researchers have identified two genes associated with binge drinking that may open doors to new, more effective treatments for excessive alcohol drinking. The scientists found that manipulating two receptors in the brain, GABA receptors and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), "caused profound reduction" of binge drinking for two weeks in rodents that...

2011-02-15 19:53:52

    * Alcohol dependence (AD) may develop through alcohol's effects on neural signaling.    * Researchers have found that neuroactive steroids may mediate some of the effects of alcohol on ÃŽ³-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors.    * These findings suggest that genetic variations in neuroactive steroid-producing enzymes may be related to risk for AD. One of the ways in which alcohol dependence (AD) may develop is through...

2010-12-21 15:58:34

How GABA transmission regulates synaptic adhesion at developing inhibitory synapses Newly published research led by Professor Z. Josh Huang, Ph.D., of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) sheds important new light on how neurons in the developing brain make connections with one another. This activity, called synapse validation, is at the heart of the process by which neural circuits self-assemble, and is directly implicated in pathology that gives rise to devastating neurodevelopmental...

2010-11-11 22:26:15

The brain works because 100 billion of its special nerve cells called neurons regulate trillions of connections that carry and process information. The behavior of each neuron is precisely determined by the proper function of many genes. In 1999, Baylor College of Medicine researcher Dr. Huda Zoghbi, and her colleagues identified mutations in one of these genes called MeCP2 as the culprit in a devastating neurological disorder called Rett syndrome. In new research in mice published in the...