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Latest Gavin Robertson Stories

Melanoma Drug From Pine Bark Substance
2014-05-21 10:20:43

By Matthew Solovey, Penn State A substance that comes from pine bark is a potential source for a new treatment of melanoma, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Current melanoma drugs targeting single proteins can initially be effective, but resistance develops relatively quickly and the disease recurs. In those instances, resistance usually develops when the cancer cell's circuitry bypasses the protein that the drug acts on, or when the cell uses other pathways to...

2011-04-26 15:05:51

While incidents of melanoma continue to increase despite the use of sunscreen and skin screenings, a topical compound called ISC-4 may prevent melanoma lesion formation, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. "The steady increase in melanoma incidence suggests that additional preventive approaches are needed to complement these existing strategies," said Gavin Robertson, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology, pathology, dermatology and surgery, and director of Penn State Hershey...

2010-12-14 08:20:43

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Halting the growth of melanoma tumors by targeting the MIC-1 protein that promotes blood vessel development in tumors may lead to improved treatment of this invasive and detrimental cancer. "Preventing vessels from developing in tumors is one way to stop them from growing," which lead author Gavin Robertson, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology, pathology, dermatology and surgery at Penn State College of Medicine, and researcher in The Foreman Foundation Research Laboratory,...

2010-12-09 17:42:26

Halting the growth of melanoma tumors by targeting the MIC-1 protein that promotes blood vessel development in tumors may lead to better treatment of this invasive and deadly cancer, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers in The Foreman Foundation Research Laboratory. "Preventing vessels from developing in tumors is one way to stop them from growing," said lead author Gavin Robertson, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology, pathology, dermatology and surgery. "However, the identity...

2010-10-12 08:26:23

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Melanoma is the sixth most common form of cancer in the U.S. It spreads so rapidly, that it causes almost all the deaths related to skin cancer. This study found that the melanoma cells use the immune system to spread and develop into lung tumors. This finding could help the treatment of these tumors. "Melanoma is the most aggressive and metastatic form of skin cancer," Gavin Robertson, professor of pharmacology, pathology, dermatology and surgery in the Penn State...

2010-10-08 02:28:28

The way melanoma cells use the immune system to spread and develop into lung tumors may lead to a therapy to decrease development of these tumors, according to Penn State researchers. "Melanoma is the most aggressive and metastatic form of skin cancer," said Gavin Robertson, professor of pharmacology, pathology, dermatology and surgery in the Penn State College of Medicine. "Therefore, identifying proteins and molecular mechanisms that regulate metastasis is important for developing drugs to...

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2009-03-02 07:52:10

Compounds extracted from green vegetables such as broccoli and cabbage could be a potent drug against melanoma, according to cancer researchers. Tests on mice suggest that these compounds, when combined with selenium, target tumors more safely and effectively than conventional therapy. "There are currently no drugs to target the proteins that trigger melanoma," said Gavin Robertson, associate professor of pharmacology, pathology and dermatology, Penn State College of Medicine. "We have...

2008-09-16 12:00:49

U.S. cancer researchers say nanoparticles filled with a drug targeting two genes that trigger melanoma might offer a potential cure for the deadly disease. Penn State University College of Medicine scientists said such treatment would provide a safer and more effective way of targeting cancer-causing genes in cancer cells without harming normal tissue. "It is a very selective and targeted approach," said Associate Professor Gavin Robertson, who led the study. "And unlike most other cancer...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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