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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 6:47 EDT

Latest Gender differences Stories

2006-01-27 09:50:00

By Chelsea Emery NEW YORK -- Some say it's a man's world, but women actually make most purchasing and entertainment decisions, according to a study that could influence advertisers and media companies. It's long been accepted that women pick out most of the clothes for the family and decide on home furnishings, but market research firm NPD's study of 51,000 U.S. households showed some surprising facets of purchasing decisions broken down by gender. Men defer to women when it comes to choosing...

2006-01-19 14:20:00

By Charnicia E. Huggins NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Theirs may not be a contact sport, but high school cross-country runners are not exempt from injury. In fact, injuries are quite common among these athletes, new study findings show. "The results from our study suggest that the injury rates of high school cross country runners continue to be consistently high, per athletic exposure (i.e., actual runner participation in a practice or meet), especially for girls, and that the causes...

2006-01-18 13:10:51

By Patricia Reaney LONDON (Reuters) - Germans have a word for it -- schadenfreude -- and when it comes to getting pleasure from someone else's misfortune, men seem to enjoy it more than women. Such is the conclusion reached by scientists at University College London in what they say is the first neuroscientific evidence of schadenfreude. Using brain-imaging techniques, they compared how men and women reacted when watching other people suffer pain. If the sufferer was someone they...

2006-01-18 13:10:00

By Patricia Reaney LONDON (Reuters) - Germans have a word for it -- schadenfreude -- and when it comes to getting pleasure from someone else's misfortune, men seem to enjoy it more than women. Such is the conclusion reached by scientists at University College London in what they say is the first neuroscientific evidence of schadenfreude. Using brain-imaging techniques, they compared how men and women reacted when watching other people suffer pain. If the sufferer was someone they liked, areas...

2005-12-28 23:09:05

By Eric Auchard SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Internet users share many common interests, but men are heavier consumers of news, stocks, sports and pornography while more women look for health and religious guidance, a broad survey of U.S. Web usage has found. The study by the Pew Internet & American Life Project to be released on Thursday finds men are slightly more intense users of the Web. Men log on more frequently and spend more time online. More men also have access to quick...

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2005-12-29 00:05:00

By Eric Auchard SAN FRANCISCO -- Internet users share many common interests, but men are heavier consumers of news, stocks, sports and pornography while more women look for health and religious guidance, a broad survey of U.S. Web usage has found. The study by the Pew Internet & American Life Project to be released on Thursday finds men are slightly more intense users of the Web. Men log on more frequently and spend more time online. More men also have access to quick broadband...

2005-09-29 12:59:02

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Caring for children and doing housework can cost you money but only if you are a young or middle-aged woman, U.S. researchers said on Thursday. Daily chores, and especially child care, may take up energy that women cannot then devote to their paid jobs, the researchers wrote in the journal Contemporary Economic Policy. But if husbands or partners share in the chores, it may reduce the damage to income, the researchers said. "Wives are still primarily doing...

2005-09-04 11:46:04

By Ben Hirschler STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - A perception that cardiovascular illness is mostly a male problem has led to poorer treatment for women with heart disease, leading doctors said on Sunday. Professor Caroline Daly of Royal Brompton Hospital in London told the European Society of Cardiology congress that despite the fact that heart attacks and strokes kill a higher percentage of women than men, the common perception that women were less likely to suffer from heart disease...

2005-08-17 20:44:46

By Anthony J. Brown, MD NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Numerous reports have described racial and gender differences in the treatment and outcome of heart attack patients, and now, new research indicates that not much as changed in recent years. Black women remain less likely than other groups to receive a variety of therapies for heart attack and they are more likely to die in the hospital. "We were really surprised by the findings," lead author Dr. Viola Vaccarino, from Emory...

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2005-04-22 09:40:29

A stranger's gaze may mean a lot, a new study says HealthDay News -- When a woman walks into a crowded room, what her eyes do in the first few seconds may determine how attractive she is to any man meeting her gaze. If she turns her eyes deliberately toward a particular man, he immediately rates her as more likeable and physically attractive, new research shows. If she glances at him but then turns her eyes away, that same man will rate her as considerably less sexy. "Our impressions of...