Quantcast

Latest Gene therapy Stories

2011-12-08 23:38:45

Three new locations for Crohn's Disease genes have been uncovered by scientists at UCL using a novel gene mapping approach. The complex genetic and environmental causes of Crohn's Disease (CD) have long been difficult to untangle. CD, a type of Inflammatory Bowel Disease that affects about 100 to 150 people per 100,000 in Europe, is characterised by inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. Even though twin and family studies suggest a high heritability for CD of 50-60%, so far the...

2011-12-08 21:35:25

New gene editing technique would heal patients with their own cells Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have developed a way to use patients' own cells to potentially cure sickle cell disease and many other disorders caused by mutations in a gene that helps produce blood hemoglobin. The technique uses cells from a patient's skin to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which are capable of developing into various types of mature tissues -- including...

2011-12-07 20:02:13

In the bone marrow, blood-forming (hematopoietic) stem cells become one of the myriad kinds of blood cells in the body or they can self-renew, maintaining that pool. However, the lack or mutation of a gene for an enzyme called Dnmt3a (DNA methyltransferase 3a) results in an abundance of stem cells and a lack of blood cells, said a consortium of researchers led by those at in the Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine Center at Baylor College of Medicine in a report online in the journal...

2011-12-01 10:52:46

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have shown that it is safe to cut and paste together different viruses in an effort to create the ultimate vehicle for gene therapy. In a phase I clinical trial, the investigators found no side effects from using a "chimeric" virus to deliver replacement genes for an essential muscle protein in patients with muscular dystrophy. "This trial demonstrates that gene therapy is no longer limited by the viruses we find in nature, and...

2011-12-01 01:46:31

New research in the FASEB Journal suggests that site-specific recombinases from either yeast or phages act not only to tag and target but also to exchange specific genes in DNA A combination of two techniques promises to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of experimental gene therapies, while also reducing potential side effects says a new research report published in the December 2011 issue of the FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org). The report describes how scientists from...

2011-11-28 22:57:00

Controlling forces between oppositely charged polymers opens a new route towards creating vectors for gene therapy Gene therapy can only be effective if delivered by a stable complex molecule. Now, scientists have determined the conditions that would stabilise complex molecular structures that are subject to inherent attractions and repulsions triggered by electric charges at the surfaces of the molecules, in a study about to be published in EPJ E´, by Valentina Mengarelli and her...

2011-11-21 23:12:05

Gene-therapy trial will attempt to restore hearing in deaf mice Researchers have found long-sought genes in the sensory hair cells of the inner ear that, when mutated, prevent sound waves from being converted to electric signals — a fundamental first step in hearing. The team, co-led by Jeffrey Holt, PhD, in the department of otolaryngology at Children´s Hospital Boston, and Andrew Griffith, MD, PhD, of the NIH´s National Institute on Deafness and other Communication...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
Related