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Last updated on April 16, 2014 at 17:34 EDT

Latest Gene Stories

2013-07-26 18:37:13

Protein moulds RNA to ensure that activating factors can hold on to it X chromosomes are very special genetic material. They differ in number between men and women. To achieve equality between sexes, one out of two X chromosomes in women is silenced. In flies, the opposite happens: in male flies, the only available X chromosome is highly activated, to compensate for the absence of the second X-chromosome. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics (MPI-IE)...

2013-07-26 13:36:43

Gene co-expression study is based on data in the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas A team of scientists has obtained intriguing insights into two groups of autism candidate genes in the mammalian brain that new evidence suggests are functionally and spatially related. The newly published analysis identifies two networked groupings from 26 genes associated with autism that are overexpressed in the cerebellar cortex, in areas dominated by neurons called granule cells. The team, composed of...

2013-07-26 12:10:38

Duke researchers have devised a way to quickly and easily target and tinker with any gene in the human genome. The new tool, which builds on an RNA-guided enzyme they borrowed from bacteria, is being made freely available to researchers who may now apply it to the next round of genome discovery. The new method also has obvious utility for gene therapy and for efforts to reprogram stem or adult cells into other cell types – for example, to make new neurons from skin cells....

2013-07-23 13:31:35

New technique can rapidly turn genes on and off, helping scientists better understand their function. Although human cells have an estimated 20,000 genes, only a fraction of those are turned on at any given time, depending on the cell’s needs — which can change by the minute or hour. To find out what those genes are doing, researchers need tools that can manipulate their status on similarly short timescales. That is now possible, thanks to a new...

2013-07-23 11:45:23

A gene long presumed dead comes to life under the full moon of inflammation, Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have found. The discovery, described in a study to be published July 23 in eLife, may help explain how anti-inflammatory steroid drugs work. It also could someday lead to entirely new classes of anti-inflammatory treatments without some of steroids' damaging side effects. Chronic inflammation plays a role in cancer and in autoimmune, cardiovascular and...

2013-07-22 10:16:49

Painstaking new analysis of the genetic sequence of the X chromosome—long perceived as the "female" counterpart to the male-associated Y chromosome—reveals that large portions of the X have evolved to play a specialized role in sperm production. This surprising finding, reported by Whitehead Institute scientists in a paper published online this week in the journal Nature Genetics, is paired with another unexpected outcome: despite its reputation as the...

Genes Regulated By Newly Found CLAMP Protein
2013-07-18 12:49:15

Brown University They say a good man is hard to find. Were it not for a newly discovered protein, the X chromosome of a male fruit fly could never be found by a gene-regulating complex that male flies need to develop and survive. And that case is just one example of what the new finding means. More generally, the research provides biologists with a model of how proteins that govern gene transcription find their targets on chromosomes, a process that’s essential to healthy...

2013-07-16 10:34:16

Breaks in the double-strands of the DNA helix can spell trouble, destabilizing the genome and resulting in changes that drive cancer, antibiotic resistance and, on a more positive note, evolution. Scientists can generate these breaks by a variety of extraneous methods in the laboratory, but Baylor College of Medicine scientists Dr. Philip Hastings and Dr. Susan Rosenberg wondered how such breaks occur without outside help - and how they occur in resting cells not actively making new copies...

RNA Stores More Functional Genome Data Than Previously Thought
2013-07-12 04:51:08

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Contrary to the belief that a large percentage of the human genome contains "junk" material, a team of Australian scientists report they have discovered an unexpectedly high proportion of functional elements that have been conserved through evolution. According to Dr. Martin Smith and Professor John Mattick of the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney, less than 1.5 percent of the human genome is devoted to conventional...

Herd Fertility May Be Improved By Understanding The Gene-rich Y Chromosomes Of Bulls
2013-07-11 15:24:22

Penn State The Y chromosomes of cattle have more genes and are more active than the Y chromosomes of other primates, according to researchers. This discovery may help biologists better understand how cattle and other mammals evolved, as well as help animal breeders and farmers better maintain and enhance fertility in the cattle industry, said Wansheng Liu, associate professor of animal genomics, Penn State. "Low fertility is a big problem for the dairy and beef industry," Liu said....


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

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