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Latest Gene Stories

2013-10-14 11:18:08

Researchers identify key proteins that help establish cell function Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new way to parse and understand how special proteins called "master regulators" read the genome, and consequently turn genes on and off. Writing in the October 13, 2013 Advance Online Publication of Nature, the scientists say their approach could make it quicker and easier to identify specific gene mutations associated with...

2013-10-14 11:16:07

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a massive online database that matches thousands of genes linked to cancer and other diseases with drugs that target those genes. Some of the drugs are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, while others are in clinical trials or just entering the drug development pipeline. The database was developed by identical twin brothers, Obi Griffith, PhD, and Malachi Griffith, PhD, whose interest in...

2013-10-14 09:48:27

New research from the University of California, Davis, shows that the tiny proportion of a cell's DNA that is located outside the cell nucleus has a disproportionately large effect on a cell's metabolism. The work, with the model plant Arabidopsis, may have implications for future treatments for inherited diseases in humans. Plant and animal cells carry most of their genes on chromosomes in the nucleus, separated from the rest of the cell. However, they also contain a small number of genes...

2013-10-08 13:23:15

Nature Study Shows Distinct Behavior of Proteins Reflects Common Biochemical Principles Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have found unexpected similarities between proteins that were thought to be fundamentally different. The team studied how proteins bind to RNA, a process required for gene expression. It is known that some proteins only bind RNAs with certain sequences. Other proteins have been deemed “non-specific” because they interact with...

2013-10-07 12:14:14

Biologists of the University of Zurich have developed a method to visualize the activity of genes in single cells. The method is so efficient that, for the first time, a thousand genes can be studied in parallel in ten thousand single human cells. Applications lie in fields of basic research and medical diagnostics. The new method shows that the activity of genes, and the spatial organization of the resulting transcript molecules, strongly vary between single cells. Whenever cells activate...

The Mystery Of Handedness
2013-10-02 05:23:47

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Most of us are right handed, with only approximately ten percent of the population of the UK, and the world at large, being left handed. But why that is so remains a mystery. Two independent studies might have given us some clues to the mystery, however. Professor John Armour and Dr. Angus Davison from The University of Nottingham collaborated with University College London's Professor Chris McManus to rule out a "strong genetic...

2013-09-30 23:23:33

Supplementation at preventive intake levels could represent potential savings of billions of dollars. Chesterfield, MO (PRWEB) September 30, 2013 Reliv International, Inc. (NASDAQ: RELV), a maker of nutritional supplements that promote optimal health, today hailed the results of a new financial report on supplements as an indication of the economic potential of nutritional epigenetics. “It’s an eye-opening report in its own right,” said Dr. Carl Hastings, Reliv vice chairman and...

2013-09-30 10:19:30

A research team centered at Brown University has compiled the largest and most stringently validated list of RNA editing sites in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a stalwart of biological research. Their research, which yielded several insights into the model organism's fundamental biology, appears Sept. 29 in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology. The "master list" totals 3,581 sites in which the enzyme ADAR might swap an "A" nucleotide for a "G" in an RNA molecule. Such a...

How Rare 'Words' In Bacterial Genes Boost Protein Production
2013-09-27 07:29:50

Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard Scientists routinely seek to reprogram bacteria to produce proteins for drugs, biofuels and more, but they have struggled to get those bugs to follow orders. But a hidden feature of the genetic code, it turns out, could get bugs with the program. The feature controls how much of the desired protein bacteria produce, a team from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University reported in the...

2013-09-26 13:11:00

Sometimes, when the DNA in a cell is copied during cell division, there is a mistake. A large portion of the genetic material could be duplicated or deleted. In each instance, there is often a greatly enhanced potential for serious genetic disease. Such changes are known as copy number variation (CNV) referring to the numbers of copies of a gene. Instead of ‘letters of the DNA alphabet’ being changed or missing, whole sentences, entire paragraphs or even pages/volumes of the encyclopedia...


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

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Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.