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Latest Gene Stories

How Cells Control The Direction In Which The Genome Is Read
2013-06-25 04:37:18

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers have identified a mechanism that allows cells to read their own DNA in the correct direction, preventing them from replicating the intergenic DNA, or so-called “junk DNA,” that makes up significant parts of our genome. Although just 15 percent of the human genome consists of protein-coding genes, research in recent years has revealed a surprising amount of the junk DNA does indeed get copied into RNA – the...

2013-06-24 15:07:59

Results indicate need to improve precision of CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided nucleases In the past year a group of synthetic proteins called CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) have generated great excitement in the scientific community as gene-editing tools. Exploiting a method that some bacteria use to combat viruses and other pathogens, CRISPR-Cas RGNs can cut through DNA strands at specific sites, allowing the insertion of new genetic material. However, a team of Massachusetts General...

2013-06-24 14:45:26

Scientists from Australia and the United States bring new insights to our understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the genome, one of the biggest challenges currently facing the fields of genomics and genetics. Their findings are published in Nature Genetics, online today. Roughly 3 meters of DNA is tightly folded into the nucleus of every cell in our body. This folding allows some genes to be 'expressed', or activated, while excluding others. Dr Tim Mercer and Professor John...

2013-06-21 10:49:14

RAP1 is a gene that also protects telomeres. This is the first time that a link has been found between these structures that shorten with ageing and obesity The discovery of an unexpected function for a gene that was associated to another process in the organism might be a solution in search of a problem, a clue to unsuspected connections. That is what has happened with RAP1, a gene that protects telomeres— the ends of chromosomes—after researchers from the Spanish National Cancer...

2013-06-20 11:15:57

In the cover story for the journal Genetics this month, neurobiologist Dan Chase and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst describe a new experimental technique they developed that will allow scientists to study the function of individual proteins in individual cell types in a living organism. The advance should allow deeper insights into protein function, Chase says, “because we can only get a true understanding of what that single protein does when we isolate its...

2013-06-17 23:04:13

GB HealthWatch has just released an innovative Weight Control eTool, a highly personalized online weight loss program based on an individual´s genes, food preferences, and behavioral traits. This tool is the first taste of what is come from a nutritional genomics company poised on the cutting edge of preventive health care; free access is available in June. San Diego, CA (PRWEB) June 17, 2013 Body weight is the result of constant interactions between a person´s genes and...

2013-06-11 21:08:00

Individuals of a particular species generally differ from one another. We are clearly most adept at recognizing members of our own species, although dog and cat owners will be ready to confirm that their pets look unique. Differences within species relate to characteristics such as size and shape but also to color: it is not only humans that show a wide range of skin pigmentation. Nevertheless, the cause of the variation in skin color in animals has remained largely a matter for conjecture....


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

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Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.