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Latest Gene Stories

2013-07-01 19:04:54

Canadian-led study will help scientists identify key genomic regions in canola, other food plants What allows certain plants to survive freezing and thrive in the Canadian climate, while others are sensitive to the slightest drop in temperature? Those that flourish activate specific genes at just the right time -- but the way gene activation is controlled remains poorly understood. A major step forward in understanding this process lies in a genomic map produced by an international...

2013-07-01 14:40:41

A team from UNIGE has developed a biotechnology that can be used in many biomedical sectors Most of our physiological functions fluctuate throughout the day. They are coordinated by a central clock in the brain and by local oscillators, present in virtually every cell. Many molecular gearwheels of this internal clock have been described by Ueli Schibler, professor at the Faculty of Science of the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland. To study how the central clock synchronizes...

2013-06-28 23:21:51

Special science segment part of Reliv International’s 25th anniversary celebration in Orlando on July 18-20 CHESTERFIELD, MO (PRWEB) June 28, 2013 Reliv International (NASDAQ: RELV) today announced that the company’s 25th anniversary conference in Orlando on July 18-20 will include a presentation on nutritional epigenetics and the science behind the soy peptide lunasin. Presenters will include Dr. Carl Hastings, Reliv chief scientific officer, and Dr. Alfredo Galvez, research...

Junk DNA Vital Biological Role
2013-06-27 08:25:25

Rebekah Eliason for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online At the center of most human cells, genomic DNA lies tucked away within a nucleus. However, a surprisingly small percentage of this DNA actually codes for genes that can be translated into proteins. In fact, some researchers estimate as much as 98 percent of this DNA seems to have a puzzling lack of purpose, leading many to refer to it as 'junk DNA.' However, a new study from UC San Francisco now emphasizes the potentially important...

Researchers Study Genetic Differences Between Domestic, Wild Tomato
2013-06-27 08:09:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An international team of researchers from the US, Europe and Japan have compiled the first comparison of both the DNA sequences and which genes are active - or being transcribed - between the domestic tomato and wild varieties. Julin Maloof, professor of plant biology in the College of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Davis, says the findings give insight into the genetic changes involved in the domestication...

How Cells Control The Direction In Which The Genome Is Read
2013-06-25 04:37:18

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers have identified a mechanism that allows cells to read their own DNA in the correct direction, preventing them from replicating the intergenic DNA, or so-called “junk DNA,” that makes up significant parts of our genome. Although just 15 percent of the human genome consists of protein-coding genes, research in recent years has revealed a surprising amount of the junk DNA does indeed get copied into RNA – the...

2013-06-24 15:07:59

Results indicate need to improve precision of CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided nucleases In the past year a group of synthetic proteins called CRISPR-Cas RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) have generated great excitement in the scientific community as gene-editing tools. Exploiting a method that some bacteria use to combat viruses and other pathogens, CRISPR-Cas RGNs can cut through DNA strands at specific sites, allowing the insertion of new genetic material. However, a team of Massachusetts General...

2013-06-24 14:45:26

Scientists from Australia and the United States bring new insights to our understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the genome, one of the biggest challenges currently facing the fields of genomics and genetics. Their findings are published in Nature Genetics, online today. Roughly 3 meters of DNA is tightly folded into the nucleus of every cell in our body. This folding allows some genes to be 'expressed', or activated, while excluding others. Dr Tim Mercer and Professor John...

2013-06-21 10:49:14

RAP1 is a gene that also protects telomeres. This is the first time that a link has been found between these structures that shorten with ageing and obesity The discovery of an unexpected function for a gene that was associated to another process in the organism might be a solution in search of a problem, a clue to unsuspected connections. That is what has happened with RAP1, a gene that protects telomeres— the ends of chromosomes—after researchers from the Spanish National Cancer...


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

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Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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