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Latest Gene Stories

2013-03-14 17:21:13

Predictability is often used synonymously with “boring,” as in that story or that outcome was so predictable. For practitioners of synthetic biology seeking to engineer valuable new microbes, however, predictability is the brass ring that must be captured. Researchers with the multi-institutional partnership known as BIOFAB have become the first to grab at least a portion of this ring by unveiling a package of public domain DNA sequences and statistical models that greatly...

How The Fruit Fly Got Its Wings
2013-03-12 16:16:04

The Ohio State University Scientists have delved deeper into the evolutionary history of the fruit fly than ever before to reveal the genetic activity that led to the development of wings — a key to the insect´s ability to survive. The wings themselves are common research models for this and other species´ appendages. But until now, scientists did not know how the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, first sprouted tiny buds that became flat wings. A cluster of only 20...

Extreme Algae Thieves Its Genes From Bacteria
2013-03-08 17:34:16

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Some microorganisms have developed the ability to thrive in the most hostile environments on Earth, from the superheated geothermal vents to pools of toxic drainage deep underground. According to a new study in the journal Science, researchers have found evidence one of these so-called “extremophiles” steals its ability to endure extreme environments from the organisms around it. While the ability to pilfer genes from...

Genome Police Undermined By Selfish Gene
2013-03-05 10:58:36

Brown University Biologists have been observing the “selfish” genetic entity segregation distorter (SD) in fruit flies for decades. Its story is a thriller among molecules, in which the SD gene destroys maturing sperm that have a rival chromosome. A new study reveals a tactic that gives SD´s villainy an extra edge. For a bunch of inanimate chemical compounds, the nucleic and amino acids caught up in the infamous “selfish” segregation distorter (SD) saga have...

2013-02-25 10:45:11

Scripps Research Institute team shows how DNA sequences long considered 'junk' are involved in gene regulation Small stretches of DNA in the human genome are known as "pseudogenes" because, while their sequences are nearly identical to those of various genes, they have long been thought to be non-coding "junk" DNA. But now, a new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) shows how pseudogenes can regulate the activity of a cancer-related gene called PTEN. The...

2013-02-25 10:43:41

Protein uses multiple means to help cells cope when oxygen runs low A protein known for turning on genes to help cells survive low-oxygen conditions also slows down the copying of new DNA strands, thus shutting down the growth of new cells, Johns Hopkins researchers report. Their discovery has wide-ranging implications, they say, given the importance of this copying – known as DNA replication – and new cell growth to many of the body's functions and in such diseases as cancer....

2013-02-19 15:32:01

Imagine two steel springs identical in look and composition but that perform differently because each was tempered at a different rate. A team of researchers including a Texas A&M University molecular biologist has shown that concept – that the speed of creation affects performance – applies to how a protein they studied impacts an organism's circadian clock function. This discovery provides new insights into the significance of the genetic code for controlling the rates at...

2013-02-18 13:05:36

The circadian clocks that control and influence dozens of basic biological processes have an unexpected "snooze button" that helps cells adapt to changes in their environment. A study by Vanderbilt University researchers published online Feb. 17 by the journal Nature provides compelling new evidence that at least some species can alter the way that their biological clocks function by using different "synonyms" that exist in the genetic code. "This provides organisms with a novel and...


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

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Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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