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Latest Gene Stories

2012-12-07 16:30:15

A 'network map' of genes involved in pain perception Scientists in Australia and Austria have described a "network map" of genes involved in pain perception. The work, published in the journal PLOS Genetics should help identify new analgesic drugs. Dr Greg Neely from the Garvan institute of Medical Research in Sydney and Professor Josef Penninger from the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna had previously screened the 14,000 genes in the fruit fly genome and identified 580 genes...

2012-12-03 17:01:12

The surface of your skin, called the epidermis, is a complex mixture of many different cell types – each with a very specific job. The production, or differentiation, of such a sophisticated tissue requires an immense amount of coordination at the cellular level, and glitches in the process can have disastrous consequences. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a master regulator of this differentiation process. "Disorders of epidermal...

2012-12-03 16:07:43

Researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia part of a large international study An international team of genetics researchers has discovered four new gene regions that contribute to low birth weight. Three of those regions influence adult metabolism, and appear to affect longer-term outcomes such as adult height, risk of type 2 diabetes and adult blood pressure. "This large study adds to the evidence that genes have a strong influence on fetal growth," said one of the...

Corn Has Many Active Genes, Could Produce High Yield
2012-12-03 11:45:34

University of Bonn Researchers at the University of Bonn investigate 1 of the oldest mysteries of plant breeding Hybrid plants provide much higher yield than their homozygous parents. Plant breeders have known this for more than 100 years and used this effect called heterosis for richer harvests. Until now, science has puzzled over the molecular processes underlying this phenomenon. Researchers at the University of Bonn and partners from Tübingen and the USA have now...

Scientists Decode Watermelon Genome, May Provide Future Benefits For Crop Improvement
2012-11-26 16:19:33

BGI Shenzhen An international team led by Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, BGI, and other institutes has completed the genomic sequence of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and the resequencing of 20 watermelon accessions. The genomic data presented in this study will shape future efforts on watermelon genetics and evolutionary research, and also provide an invaluable resource for other plants research and crop genetic improvement. The results were published online in...

DNA Methylation Can Help Predict Biological Age
2012-11-22 06:13:28

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If you look around at your friends and family, it is clear our biological clocks tick differently. Women tend to live longer than men do, some individuals can look years younger — or older — than their chronological age, and diseases can affect our aging process. The University of California, San Diego School of Medicine led a new study, published online in the journal Molecular Cell, that describes markers and a model...

Telomere Length Predicts Longevity
2012-11-20 13:04:15

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from the University of East Anglia in the UK has found a correlation among biological age, longevity and an individual´s DNA. By studying a wild population of Seychelles Warblers on a small island, the geneticists were able to demonstrate how the end-caps of chromosomes, known as telomeres, shorten due to age and stress, and can be an indication of life expectancy. "Over time these telomeres get broken down and...

2012-11-20 11:47:58

Certain mutated cells keep trying to replicate their DNA – with disastrous results – even after medications rob them of the raw materials to do so, according to new research from USC. New imaging techniques allowed scientists to see for the first time that while chemotherapy drugs shut down the DNA replication process of most cancer cells, so-called "checkpoint mutants" just keep chugging along, unwinding the DNA and creating damaged DNA strands that can result in the kind of...

Are Humans Getting Dumber?
2012-11-20 09:51:11

Jedidiah Becker for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Take a glance at the arc of human civilization. As just a few notable achievements, you might start with the discovery of agriculture before moving on to survey the architectural marvels of the ancient world, the revolution of Gutenberg´s printing press and finally landing on the modern ubiquity of rapidly evolving computer technology. This view tends to give a sense that the human intellect may have a nearly limitless...


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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