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Latest Gene Stories

2012-11-09 11:16:22

Research presented at American Society of Human Genetics annual meeting, Nov. 6 to 10, San Francisco About 10.6% of the inherited genetic risk for developing coronary artery disease (CAD) can be explained by specific DNA variations, according to research reported today at the American Society of Human Genetics 2012 meeting. The research, conducted by scientists in the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D consortium, pinpointed 20 previously unidentified mutations during a two-stage meta-analysis of 63,746...

Humans And Primates Share DNA But Genes Work Differently
2012-11-08 08:43:59

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Our primate cousins share over 90% of our DNA, but the expression or activity patterns of genes differ across species in ways that explain the distinct biology and behavior of each species. In a presentation at the American Society of Human Genetics 2012 meeting, University of Chicago associate professor of human genetics Yoav Gilad, Ph.D. described the DNA factors that contribute to the differences. Up to 40 percent of the...

2012-11-06 03:36:01

Johns Hopkins researchers have succeeded in teaching computers how to identify commonalities in DNA sequences known to regulate gene activity, and to then use those commonalities to predict other regulatory regions throughout the genome. The tool is expected to help scientists better understand disease risk and cell development. The work was reported in two recent papers in Genome Research, published online on July 3 and Sept. 27. “Our goal is to understand how regulatory...

Unlocking DNA Repair Secrets
2012-10-31 12:53:16

University of Sheffield Scientists from the University of Sheffield have unlocked one of the secrets to DNA repair —helping doctors identify DNA base damage and a patient's susceptibility to certain types of cancer. Groundbreaking research led by Dr David Williams from the University of Sheffield's Department of Chemistry and an international collaboration of expert researchers has discovered how some proteins recognize damaged bases within DNA which, if untreated, could lead to...

Evolution Follows A Predictable Genetic Pattern Researchers Find
2012-10-26 10:20:03

Evolution, often perceived as a series of random changes, might in fact be driven by a simple and repeated genetic solution to an environmental pressure that a broad range of species happen to share, according to new research. Princeton University research published in the journal Science suggests that knowledge of a species' genes – and how certain external conditions affect the proteins encoded by those genes – could be used to determine a predictable evolutionary pattern...

2012-10-26 00:53:27

Genetics researchers at the University of Adelaide have solved a 40-year mystery for a family beset by a rare intellectual disability — and they've discovered something new about the causes of intellectual disability in the process. While many intellectual disabilities are caused directly by a genetic mutation in the so-called "protein coding" part of our genes, the researchers found that in their case the answer laid outside the gene and in the regulation of proteins. Protein...

Flycatchers' Genomes Reveal How 1 Species Became 2
2012-10-25 09:07:53

Just how new species are established is still one of the most central questions in biology. In an article in the leading scientific journal Nature, researchers at Uppsala University in Sweden describe how they mapped the genomes of the European pied flycatcher and the collared flycatcher and found that it is disparate chromosome structures rather than separate adaptations in individual genes that underlies the separation of the species. "We were surprised that such a large part of the...

2012-10-23 20:48:07

A study led by The University of Manchester has demonstrated that new technology that can analyze millions of gene sequences in a matter of seconds is an effective way to quickly and accurately identify diseases in skeletons. Professor Terry Brown, working in partnership with Professor Charlotte Roberts from Durham University, used a next generation sequencing approach, including hybridization capture technology, to identify tuberculosis genes in a 19th century female skeleton found in a...

2012-10-23 10:18:13

Like job-seekers searching for a new position, living things sometimes have to pick up a new skill if they are going to succeed. Researchers from the University of California, Davis, and Uppsala University, Sweden, have shown for the first time how living organisms do this. The observation, published Oct. 19 in the journal Science, closes an important gap in the theory of natural selection. Scientists have long wondered how living things evolve new functions from a limited set of genes....

RNA-world Hypothesis Under The Microscope
2012-10-15 05:27:46

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A chemical model developed by a team of US researchers shows how the Earth's first life forms may have packaged the genetic coding material known as ribonucleic acid (RNA), demonstrating one of the earliest steps that could have paved the way for the formation of cellular life some four billion years ago. The Penn State University scientists behind the project used a type of macromolecule called polymers to create primitive...


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

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Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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