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Latest Gene Stories

2012-05-04 12:31:57

Two researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth have helped to identify switches that can turn on or off genes associated with colorectal cancer. The finding offers clues about the development of colorectal cancer and could–potentially–provide targets for new therapies. Jason Moore, Third Century Professor of genetics and the director of the Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Sciences, and Richard Cowper-Sal.lari, a graduate student in Moore's lab, were part of a...

2012-05-02 13:22:17

Diseases and injuries trigger warning signals in our cells. As a result, genes are expressed and proteins produced, modified or degraded to adapt to the external danger and to protect the organism. In order to be able to produce a particular protein, the corresponding DNA segment, the gene, needs to be expressed and translated. The DNA is localized in the cell nucleus, and exists as a long string that is coiled and bound by proteins. ARTD1 is one such protein, and therefore has the potential...

2012-04-30 14:13:53

Gene Is Involved in Fanconi Anemia — Thale Cress as Model Organism Scientists of KIT and the University of Birmingham have identified relevant new functions of a gene that plays a crucial role in Fanconi anemia, a life-threatening disease. The FANCM gene is known to be important for the stability of the genome. Now, the researchers found that FANCM also plays a key role in the recombination of genetic information during inheritance. For their studies, the scientists used thale cress...

2012-04-27 22:18:04

Novel regulatory molecules called mirror-microRNAs control multiple aspects of brain function Our genes control many aspects of who we are – from the colour of our hair to our vulnerability to certain diseases – but how are the genes, and consequently the proteins they make themselves controlled? Researchers have discovered a new group of molecules which control some of the fundamental processes behind memory function and may hold the key to developing new therapies for...

2012-04-27 22:05:03

Researchers at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) led a study discovering a gene for a new form of intellectual disability, as well as how it likely affects cognitive development by disrupting neuron functioning. CAMH Senior Scientist Dr. John Vincent and his team found a mutation in the gene NSUN2 among three sisters with intellectual disability, a finding to be published in the May issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics. The discovery was made after mapping...

2012-04-27 02:26:51

TORONTO, April 27, 2012 /PRNewswire/ - Researchers at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) led a study discovering a gene for a new form of intellectual disability, as well as how it likely affects cognitive development by disrupting neuron functioning. CAMH Senior Scientist Dr. John Vincent and his team found a mutation in the gene NSUN2 among three sisters with intellectual disability, a finding to be published in the May issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics....

2012-04-26 22:30:06

New York University biologists have discovered new mechanisms that control how proteins are expressed in different regions of embryos, while also shedding additional insight into how physical traits are arranged in body plans. The researchers investigated a specific theory–morphogen theory, which posits that proteins controlling traits are arranged as gradients, with different amounts of proteins activating genes to create specified physical features. This theory was first put forth...

Children Age Faster When Exposed To Violence And Bullying
2012-04-25 10:07:00

Researchers have found that violence in the lives of children can cause changes in their DNA equivalent to seven to 10 years of premature aging. Scientists measured this cellular aging by studying the ends of children´s chromosomes, called telomeres. Telomeres are DNA sequences that act like the plastic tips on shoelaces, which prevent the DNA in chromosomes from unraveling. Each time a cell divides, the telomeres become shorter until a cell dies when it can´t divide anymore,...

2012-04-24 13:03:27

Researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified a gene that modifies the risk of newborns with cystic fibrosis (CF) developing neonatal intestinal obstruction, a potentially lethal complication of CF. Their findings, which appeared online March 15 in PLoS Genetics, along with the findings of their Toronto-based colleagues, published April 1 in Nature Genetics, may lead to a better understanding of how the intestines work and pave the way for identifying genes involved in secondary complications...

2012-04-23 13:15:39

Bacteria evolved way to safeguard crucial genetic material Just as banks store away only the most valuable possessions in the most secure safes, cells prioritize which genes they guard most closely, researchers at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory´s European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have found. The study, published online today in Nature, shows that bacteria have evolved a mechanism that protects important genes from random mutation, effectively reducing the risk of...


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

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