Quantcast

Latest Gene Stories

Tissue Regeneration Study Learns From Salamanders
2012-09-26 11:53:50

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the Salk Institute recently studied the regeneration of new limbs in salamanders and believe that the findings could be useful in studies on regenerative medicine for humans. The scientists published two different studies on the Mexican axolotl, a species of aquatic salamander that has lizard-like characteristics. They found that the salamanders needed more than just the activation of genes...

2012-09-17 16:17:54

Researchers from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) have identified a new role of a chemical involved in controlling the genes underlying memory and learning. "The brain is a plastic tissue, and we know that learning and memory require various genes to be expressed," says CAMH Senior Scientist Dr. Art Petronis, who is a senior author on the new study. "Our research has identified how the chemical 5-hmC may be involved in the epigenetic processes allowing this plasticity."...

Five Genes That Determine Facial Shapes Discovered
2012-09-14 10:01:50

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If you have ever stared at yourself in the bathroom mirror wondering why your face looks the way it does, then this story is for you. Researchers have discovered five genes that determine human facial shapes, and understanding these genes could one day provide valuable data about a person´s appearance, relying on DNA alone; in fact it could prove very valuable for forensics. Previously, there has been no known information...

Genes Associated With Genomic Expansions That Cause Disease Identified
2012-09-10 11:49:17

Examining trinucleotide repeats A study of more than 6,000 genes in a common species of yeast has identified the pathways that govern the instability of GAA/TTC repeats. In humans, the expansions of these repeats is known to inactivate a gene — FXN — which leads to Friedreich's ataxia, a neurodegenerative disease that is currently incurable. In yeast, long repeats also destabilize the genome, manifested by the breakage of chromosomes. Working with collaborators at Tufts...

2012-09-03 11:23:39

DEAD-box proteins function as recycling nanopistons when unwinding RNA Molecular biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have solved one of the mysteries of how double-stranded RNA is remodeled inside cells in both their normal and disease states. The discovery may have implications for treating cancer and viruses in humans. The research, which was published this week in Nature, found that DEAD-box proteins, which are ancient enzymes found in all forms of life, function as...

A Model For Development Built By Biologists
2012-08-31 12:40:24

Caltech biologists create the first predictive computational model of gene networks that control the development of sea-urchin embryos As an animal develops from an embryo, its cells take diverse paths, eventually forming different body parts–muscles, bones, heart. In order for each cell to know what to do during development, it follows a genetic blueprint, which consists of complex webs of interacting genes called gene regulatory networks. Biologists at the California Institute...

shutterstock_67072621
2012-08-26 08:08:46

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The next time you leave your DNA behind be forewarned that you are now not only leaving your biological fingerprint behind for prying eyes, but also leaving evidence of what color your hair and eyes are. Until the mid-1980s, DNA at a crime scene went largely unchecked due to lack of technology to search it out. And for the last two decades, in order for a crime scene detective to match DNA to a suspect, samples had to be taken from...

2012-08-21 23:27:07

Numerous viruses are used in the service of science today. They serve as gene taxis to transfer therapeutic genes into body cells or as therapeutic viruses targeted to infect and destroy cancer cells. For such applications, the viruses are often equipped with additional genes, such as for immune mediators or for proteins inducing programmed cell death. However, these gene products can harm the body if they are released at the wrong moment or at excessive levels. "Ideally, we want to be able...

Harvard Scientists Write Book In DNA And Accurately Copy, Read It Back
2012-08-17 10:57:16

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online DNA, the building block of life, is now home to more than just the world´s living creatures. Scientists from Harvard University report that they have written an entire novel in DNA, a feat that could revolutionize our ability to save data. Our genetic code packs billions of gigabytes into a single gram. That is significantly more information that a single microchip could even think about storing. In fact, a single milligram...


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

More Articles (2 articles) »
Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
Related