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Latest Gene Stories

2014-05-12 11:33:31

Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research Whitehead Institute scientists have identified a genetic cause of a facial disorder known as hemifacial microsomia (HFM). The researchers find that duplication of the gene OTX2 induces HFM, the second-most common facial anomaly after cleft lip and palate. HFM affects approximately one in 3,500 births. While some cases appear to run in families, no gene had been found to be causative. That is until Whitehead Fellow Yaniv Erlich and his lab set...

Genetically Altering E. Coli With New Semi-Synthetic DNA Base Pairs
2014-05-08 07:24:29

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It is well-known that all life on Earth is made up of two base pairs, known as A-T (adenine–thymine) and C-G (cytosine–guanine), which form the standard double helix DNA strand. But that could all change now that researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have engineered a bacterium to contain an extra pair of DNA “letters” that are not found anywhere else in nature. The cells of this bacterium are also able to...

2014-05-07 23:00:38

Werner Maas' "Gene Expression and Its Regulation" highlights significant molecular approach in the field of biology. NEW YORK (PRWEB) May 08, 2014 “Gene Expression and Its Regulation” tells of author Werner Maas' involvement in the development of molecular genetics; his main contributions have been in the discovery of regulatory genes that are essential for the proper functioning of genes in the maintenance of living cells. The main part of this book deals with the...

2014-05-07 12:31:05

First example of in vivo replication of a synthetic DNA base pair published in Nature SAN DIEGO, May 7, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Synthorx Inc. announced today the official launch of the company, which will be focused on using synthetic biology to improve the discovery and development of new medicines, diagnostics and vaccines. In addition, research was published today in Nature by Floyd Romesberg, Ph.D., Synthorx's co-founder and associate professor of The Scripps Research Institute,...

2014-05-07 08:54:14

Each time a human cell divides, it must first make a copy of its 46 chromosomes to serve as an instruction manual for the new cell. Normally, this process goes off without a hitch. But from time to time, the information isn't copied and collated properly, leaving gaps or breaks that the cell has to carefully combine back together. Researchers have long recognized that some regions of the chromosome,called "fragile sites," are more prone to breakage and can be a breeding ground for human...

2014-05-06 15:10:36

Recent research has shown that tiny fragments of DNA circulating in a person's blood can allow scientists to monitor cancer growth and even get a sneak peek into a developing fetus' gene sequences. But isolating and sequencing these bits of genetic material renders little insight into how that DNA is used to generate the dizzying array of cells, tissues and biological processes that define our bodies and our lives. Now researchers at Stanford University have moved beyond relying on the...

2014-04-30 23:08:10

OriGene Technologies, the industry’s largest supplier of gene-centric research tools, launches a new product line of gene-knockout kits using CRISPR technologies. The new products provide a complete solution for researchers to knock out a human gene at the chromosomal level. Rockville, MD (PRWEB) April 30, 2014 OriGene Technologies (Rockville, MD), the industry’s largest supplier of gene-centric research tools, launches a new product line of gene-knockout kits using CRISPR...

2014-04-30 12:14:38

Viruses and other external threats drive evolution of robust architectures The robust defenses that yeast cells have evolved to protect themselves from environmental threats hold lessons that can be used to design computer networks and analyze how secure they are, say computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University. Environmental "noise" is a key evolutionary pressure that shapes the interconnections within cells, as well as those of neural networks and bacterial/ecological networks,...

2014-04-28 10:11:32

Large sections of the genome that were once referred to as “junk” DNA have been linked to human heart failure, according to research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. So-called junk DNA was long thought to have no important role in heredity or disease because it doesn’t code for proteins. But emerging research in recent years has revealed that many of these sections of the genome produce RNA molecules that, despite not being proteins, still have important...

2014-04-25 10:07:07

Scientists discover that modifications to the RNA of the powerhouses in each of your body's countless cells might be influencing your fitness Although our chromosomes are relatively stable within our lifetimes, the genetic material found in our mitochondria is highly variable across individuals and may impact upon human health, say researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital. Genomes are changing, not just from generation to generation, but even...


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'