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Latest Gene Stories

2013-12-20 10:32:36

As part of an international research project, a team of researchers has developed a DNA clamp that can detect mutations at the DNA level with greater efficiency than methods currently in use. Their work could facilitate rapid screening of those diseases that have a genetic basis, such as cancer, and provide new tools for more advanced nanotechnology. The results of this research is published this month in the journal ACS Nano. Toward a new generation of screening tests An increasing...

Technique Accelerates Gene Discovery
2013-12-13 08:05:12

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers working to decipher the role of genes since the completion of the Human Genome Project may see their efforts accelerated by a new approach that lets them permanently and selectively delete genes from a cell's DNA. The new system, known as CRISPR, was developed by researchers at MIT, the Broad Institute, and the Whitehead Institute, and should allow scientists to study the entire genome at once. In two new papers...

Secret Code Discovered In Human DNA
2013-12-13 05:26:03

[ Watch the Video: Human DNA Has Been Hiding A Secret ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A newly discovered ‘second code’ hiding within our DNA is casting new light on how changes to DNA impact health and disease, according to a study published Friday in the journal Science. The new code is changing the way scientists read and interpret genetic instructions and mutations. Since the genetic code was deciphered in the 1960s, scientists have assumed it...

New Online Database Sheds Light On Gene Patenting Process
2013-12-08 06:29:33

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online Researchers from Cambria, a non-profit biotech research organization, and the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), have developed a new online database revealing which organizations have applied for patents related to genes and proteins in living organisms. The open-sourced PatSeq registry, which is the subject of a paper published in last week’s edition of Nature Biotechnology, currently holds over 120 million DNA...

Coffee Beer Affects Longevity
2013-12-06 15:35:27

[ Watch the Video: Will Beer Or Coffee Contribute To Your Aging? ] Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Each time our cells replicate in our bodies, the end points of chromosomal DNA - known as telomeres - copy themselves to the new cell, shortening with each subsequent copy until they can no longer keep the cell viable, resulting in its eventual death. However, a group of researchers from Tel Aviv University’s (TAU) Department of Molecular Microbiology and...

2013-12-06 00:03:53

A group of Illinois researchers, led by Centennial Chair Professor of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Huimin Zhao, has demonstrated the use of an innovative DNA engineering technique to discover potentially valuable functions hidden within bacterial genomes.  Their work was reported in a Nature Communications article on December 5, 2013 (DOI: 10.1038/ncomms3894). The genome of every bacterial species contains genes that can synthesize a diverse arsenal of...

Extreme Genomic Evolution Discovered In Burmese Pythons
2013-12-03 07:05:43

[ Watch the Video: Genomics Reveal The Evolution Of Snakes ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of researchers have sequenced the genome of the Burmese python, or Python molurus bivittatus, finding large numbers of rapidly evolved genes in snakes. Their findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), reveal that these genetic changes are linked to extreme characteristics in snakes. The discovery of these characteristics,...

2013-11-25 16:37:53

A new view of our chromosomes reveals a complex picture Chromosomes – the 46 tightly-wrapped packages of genetic material in our cells – are iconically depicted as X-shaped formations. However, those neat X’s only appear when a cell is about to divide and the entire contents of its genome duplicated. Until now researchers have not been able to get a good picture of the way that our DNA – some two meters of strands all told – is neatly bundled into the nucleus while enabling...

2013-11-25 13:13:58

A molecular technique that will help the scientific community to analyze -- on a scale previously impossible -- molecules that play a critical role in regulating gene expression has been developed by a research team led by a chemist and a plant biologist at Penn State University. The scientists developed a method that enables more-accurate prediction of how ribonucleic acid molecules (RNAs) fold within living cells, thus shedding new light on how plants -- as well as other living organisms --...

Two Y Genes Can Replace Entire Y Chromosome For Assisted Reproduction In Mice
2013-11-21 15:33:20

University of Hawaii at Manoa The Y chromosome is a symbol of maleness, present only in males and encoding genes important for male reproduction. But live mouse offspring can be generated with assisted reproduction using germ cells from males with the Y chromosome contribution limited to only two genes: the testis determinant factor Sry and the spermatogonial proliferation factor Eif2s3y. "Does this mean that the Y chromosome (or most of it) is no longer needed? Yes, given our current...


Latest Gene Reference Libraries

Knockout Mouse
2013-10-02 11:52:01

A Knockout Mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which researchers have inactivated, or “knocked out,” an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The loss of gene activity frequently causes changes in a mouse’s phenotype, which includes appearance, behavior, or other apparent and biochemical characteristics. Knockout mice are significant animal models for studying the role of genes which have been sequenced but whose functions haven’t...

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Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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