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Latest General anesthetics Stories

Propofol Breakthrough New Anesthetics
2013-09-23 09:33:59

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from an international team of scientists has revealed the specific chemical mechanism behind the anesthetic propofol, the drug widely known for being implicated in the death of music icon Michael Jackson. According to a report published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, the international team located the specific site on the brain where propofol binds to receptors and sedates patients before surgery. "For many...

2013-09-18 23:27:49

The Anesthetic Journal has released a study detailing the use of two drug combinations utilized for oral surgery. (PRWEB) September 18, 2013 Sedation dentistry is a practice that has been used in the dental field dating back to the 1840’s. Technology and dental science has rapidly evolved since then, allowing for different forms of sedation to be administered. The most well-known dental surgery involving sedation is the extraction of the third molars, also known as wisdom teeth. There...

2013-07-29 16:20:06

University of Utah study shows isoflurane may provide alternative to electroconvulsive therapy Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has long been considered the most effective treatment of medication-resistant or refractory depression, millions of people who might benefit don't take advantage of it because of the treatment's side effects and public misperception of the procedure. If the results of a campuswide collaboration of University of Utah researchers are borne out by larger...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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