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Latest Genes Stories

2011-07-07 19:23:55

Scripps Research Institute scientists have discovered a basic mechanism that can enable developing cancer cells to sustain abnormal growth. The finding is expected to lead to the targeting of this mechanism with drugs and diagnostic techniques. The study, which recently appeared in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, illuminates the roles of two nearly identical proteins, Cks1 and Cks2. These proteins were known to be overexpressed in many cancers,...

2011-06-24 17:14:53

Johns Hopkins researchers identify a potential new way of blocking activity of gene that causes HD Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a natural mechanism that might one day be used to block the expression of the mutated gene known to cause Huntington's disease. Their experiments offer not an immediate cure, but a potential new approach to stopping or even preventing the development of this relentless neurodegenerative disorder. Huntington's disease is a rare, fatal disorder caused by a...

2011-06-20 19:53:33

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet have discovered that a gene linked to dyslexia has a surprising biological function: it controls cilia, the antenna-like projections that cells use to communicate. Dyslexia is largely hereditary and linked to a number of genes, the functions of which are, however, largely unknown. This present study from Karolinska Institutet and Helsinki University now shows that one of these genes, DCDC2, is involved in regulating the signalling of cilia in brain...

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2011-06-15 09:15:00

According to a new study published in the journal Cell, Wnt signaling, already known to control many biological processes, between hair follicles and melanocyte stem cells can determine hair pigmentation. The research at NYU Langone Medical Center was led by Mayumi Ito, PhD, assistant professor at the Ronald O. Pereleman Department of Dermatology at NYU. "We have known for decades that hair follicle stem cells and pigment-producing melanocyte cells collaborate to produce colored hair, but...

2011-06-07 10:15:42

The protein MeCP2 is porridge to the finicky neuron. Like Goldilocks, the neuron or brain cell needs the protein in just the right amount. Girls born with dysfunctional MeCP2 (methyl-CpG-binding protein 2) develop Rett syndrome, a neurological disorder. Too much MeCP2 can cause spasticity or developmental delay with autism-like symptoms in boys. Now, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital have found that the neuron needs a steady supply of this protein for its...

2011-05-27 13:37:04

How females select their sexual partners is a matter of more than passing concern to a large number of males.  Focus has gradually switched from the idea that certain males are the most attractive or the best and researchers are increasingly considering the idea that particular individuals might be intrinsically compatible.  Dating agencies routinely include questions about potential partners' hobbies and interests.  Such issues are clearly important but the latest results from...

2011-05-23 21:59:37

Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have discovered a protein signaling pathway that becomes hyperactivated in human sarcoma cells, suggesting that medications to inhibit this pathway may be effective in the treatment of human sarcomas. The research is published in the current issue of the journal Cancer Cell. A team of researchers led by Stuart Aaronson, MD, Jack and Jane B. Aron Professor and Chairman of the Department of Oncological Sciences at Mount Sinai School of Medicine,...

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2011-05-20 12:45:19

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee have for the first time successfully characterized the earliest structural formation of the disease type of the protein that causes Huntington's disease. The incurable, hereditary neurological disorder is always fatal and affects one in 10,000 Americans.Huntington's disease is caused by a renegade protein "huntingtin" that destroys neurons in areas of the brain concerned with the emotions,...

2011-05-16 19:37:30

Over-activation of a single gene promotes leukemia, but its loss causes liver cancer An international team of researchers, led by scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, and the Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital in China, say a human gene implicated in the development of leukemia also acts to prevent cancer of the liver. Writing in the May 17 issue of the journal Cancer Cell, Gen-Sheng Feng, PhD, UCSD professor of pathology, and colleagues in San Diego,...

2011-05-16 19:24:39

Worm with abundant ability to regenerate relies on ancient gene to make decisions Most people don't think worms are cool. But the tiny flatworm that Northwestern University scientist Christian Petersen studies can do something very cool indeed: it can regenerate itself from nearly every imaginable injury, including decapitation. When cut in half, it becomes two worms. This amazing ability of the planarian flatworm to regenerate its entire body from a small wedge of tissue has fascinated...


Latest Genes Reference Libraries

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2011-01-24 12:59:16

The Herpesviridae, a large family of DNA viruses, causes disease in animals and humans. Members of this family are known as herpesviruses. They all share a common structure where they are composed of relatively large double-stranded, linear DNA genomes encoding 100-200 genes encased within an icosahedral protein cage called the capsid. The whole particle is known as a virion. They are all nuclear-replicating. When a viral particle contacts a cell with specific types of receptor molecules...

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