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Latest Genes Stories

2014-04-18 14:05:01

Scientists studying the most common form of inherited mental disability—a genetic disease called “Fragile X syndrome”—have uncovered new details about the cellular processes responsible for the condition that could lead to the development of therapies to restore some of the capabilities lost in affected individuals. In a paper that will be published in the May 8 Molecular Cell, but is being made available this week in the early online edition of the journal, the researchers show...

2014-04-18 11:32:58

Researchers at UC Davis have identified a new feature of the genetic mutation responsible for the progressive neurodegenerative disorder, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) — the formation of "R-loops," which they believe may be associated with the disorder's neurological symptoms, such as tremors, lack of balance, features of Parkinsonism, and cognitive decline. The finding suggests that the R-loops may be potential targets for drug development, said Paul Hagerman,...

2014-04-17 23:01:14

Researchers at UC Davis have identified a new feature of the genetic mutation responsible for the progressive neurodegenerative disorder fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) — the formation of “R-loops,” which they believe may be associated with the disorder’s neurological symptoms, such as tremors, lack of balance, features of Parkinsonism, and cognitive decline. Sacramento, CA (PRWEB) April 17, 2014 Researchers at UC Davis have identified a new feature of the...

2014-03-26 16:18:12

In mice, dietary changes slow down progression of the disease Working with genetically engineered mice, Johns Hopkins neuroscientists report they have identified what they believe is the cause of the vast disintegration of a part of the brain called the corpus striatum in rodents and people with Huntington's disease: loss of the ability to make the amino acid cysteine. They also found that disease progression slowed in mice that were fed a diet rich in cysteine, which is found in foods...

2014-02-28 13:39:01

Study helps explain chronic inflammation in autoimmunity and cancer Activation of beta-catenin, the primary mediator of the ubiquitous Wnt signaling pathway, alters the immune system in lasting and harmful ways, a team of Chicago-based researchers demonstrate in the February 26, 2014, issue of Science Translational Medicine. An increase in beta-catenin in certain types of T cells—a class of white blood cells—causes chronic inflammation in the intestine and colon, eventually leading...

Researchers Discover Gene Responsible For Dissected Leaves
2014-02-14 13:19:31

Max Planck Institute Arabidopsis thaliana lost the RCO gene over the course of evolution and thus forms simple leaves Spinach looks nothing like parsley, and basil bears no resemblance to thyme. Each plant has a typical leaf shape that can differ even within the same family. The information about what shape leaves will be is stored in the DNA. According to researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne, the hairy bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta) has a...

Protein Study Opens A New Avenue For Cancer Researchers
2014-02-04 13:09:26

Brigham Young University One of the hopes for victory against cancer hinges on naturally-occurring proteins whose job is to make their host cell die. Since their natural role is to stop unhealthy cell proliferation, the idea is that one or more of these proteins could be harnessed to stop the growth of tumors. Brigham Young University scientists recently stumbled onto one potential tumor suppressor with an especially ominous name: Programmed Cell Death Protein 5 (aka PDCD5). What...

2014-01-31 10:54:35

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered what appears to be a potent stimulator of new bone growth. The finding could lead to new treatments for osteoporosis and other diseases that occur when the body doesn't make enough bone. Osteoporosis affects 55 percent of Americans age 50 and older. Of that age group, one in three women and one in 12 men are believed to have osteoporosis, a condition responsible for millions of fractures each year, mostly...

2014-01-10 11:07:09

A team of scientists at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans has discovered the structure of the active form of E6-associated protein (E6AP), an enzyme that acts as a master regulator in the body. They report, for the first time, that the active form of E6AP is composed of three distinct protein molecules. E6AP controls functions as diverse as the ability of nerve cells to "rewire" themselves in response to external stimuli and the mechanism by which certain viruses, like human...

Stem Cell Research Cure Baldness
2013-12-20 09:45:37

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Regenerative medicine research conducted throughout this year at the University of Southern California (USC) could lead to new ways to counter baldness and receding hairlines using stem cells. USC Assistant Professor of Pathology Dr. Krzysztof Kobielak and his colleagues have published a trio of papers in the journals Stem Cells and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) describing some of the biological...


Latest Genes Reference Libraries

69_e588e01b31a2e4f3646b095787aff303
2011-01-24 12:59:16

The Herpesviridae, a large family of DNA viruses, causes disease in animals and humans. Members of this family are known as herpesviruses. They all share a common structure where they are composed of relatively large double-stranded, linear DNA genomes encoding 100-200 genes encased within an icosahedral protein cage called the capsid. The whole particle is known as a virion. They are all nuclear-replicating. When a viral particle contacts a cell with specific types of receptor molecules...

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Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.