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Latest Genes Stories

Why Do Fat Cells Get Fat?
2012-06-25 13:47:23

Surprising finding about WNT signaling points to Sfrp5 as a potential target for anti-obesity drugs As the world fights obesity at the human level, scientists at the University of Michigan and their colleagues have made a surprising finding at the microscopic level that could help fuel that fight. Their work helps explain why fat-storing cells get fatter, and burn fat slower, as obesity sets in. If their findings from mice can be shown to apply to humans, they may provide a new target...

2012-06-21 02:19:04

A new gene-silencing strategy can reverse core symptoms associated with Huntington's disease, according to a preclinical study published by Cell Press in the June 21st issue of the journal Neuron. The short-term therapy produced sustained benefits in both mouse and primate animal models of this neurodegenerative disorder, which currently lacks an effective treatment. "Our approach is feasible for development now into a therapy for Huntington's disease in man," says senior study author Don...

2012-05-31 01:31:03

Breast-cancer researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found that two related receptors in a robust signaling pathway must work together as a team to maintain normal activity in mammary stem cells. Mammary stem cells produce various kinds of breast cell types. They may also drive the development and growth of malignant breast tumors. Published recently in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the research also suggests that a new signaling pathway may be involved, a...

2012-05-29 08:12:26

Researchers identify mechanism key in drug allergy Adverse drug reactions are a major issue that cause harm, are costly and restrict treatment options for patients and the development of new drugs. A groundbreaking finding by researchers from the La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology could lead to a new way to dramatically improve drug safety by identifying drugs at risk to cause potentially fatal genetic-linked hypersensitivity reactions before their use in man....

2012-05-22 22:57:04

The impact and influence of thirty years of research into the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway are highlighted in a special issue of The EMBO Journal. “Three decades of Wnt signalling” summarizes many of the crucial scientific developments that have taken place since the discovery of the first mammalian Wnt gene in 1982. The reviews also describe many of the crucial research findings that have established the pathway as one of the fundamental signal transduction mechanisms in...

2012-05-22 21:29:55

Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have achieved, for the first time, the generation of neuronal cells from stem cells of Fragile X patients. The discovery paves the way for research that will examine restoration of normal gene expression in Fragile X patients. Fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation, affecting hundreds of thousands of patients worldwide. The syndrome is caused by lack of normal expression (functioning) of the FMR1 gene...

2012-05-11 15:09:28

New research findings show that embryonic stem cells unable to fully compact the DNA inside them cannot complete their primary task: differentiation into specific cell types that give rise to the various types of tissues and structures in the body. Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University found that chromatin compaction is required for proper embryonic stem cell differentiation to occur. Chromatin, which is composed of histone proteins and DNA, packages DNA...

2012-05-02 15:09:41

In the United States, a baby is born with a facial cleft every hour, of every day of the year! Such birth defects result from both gene mutations and environmental insults. PRDM16 is a transcription factor originally described as being aberrantly activated in specific types of leukemia's, and more recently as a master regulator of brown adipose tissue differentiation. In a study published in the April 2012 issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine, investigators have now shown that this...

2012-04-25 20:19:20

A team led by scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) publishes research today indicating a striking association between genes found disrupted in children with autism and genes that are targets of FMRP, the protein generated by the gene FMR1, whose dysfunction causes Fragile-X syndrome. The new study appears online April 25 in the journal Neuron. Fragile-X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. It is also counted among the autism spectrum...


Latest Genes Reference Libraries

69_e588e01b31a2e4f3646b095787aff303
2011-01-24 12:59:16

The Herpesviridae, a large family of DNA viruses, causes disease in animals and humans. Members of this family are known as herpesviruses. They all share a common structure where they are composed of relatively large double-stranded, linear DNA genomes encoding 100-200 genes encased within an icosahedral protein cage called the capsid. The whole particle is known as a virion. They are all nuclear-replicating. When a viral particle contacts a cell with specific types of receptor molecules...

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Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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