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Latest Genetic mapping Stories

Scientists Sequence Tomato Genome
2012-05-30 13:56:30

Lee Rannals for RedOrbit.com If you ever wondered what makes the sauce on a pizza taste so good, wonder no more because scientists have unraveled the genetic make-up of a tomato. Scientists report in the journal Nature that they have performed a full genome sequence from the "Heinz 1706" tomato. The researchers say that tomatoes possess about 35,0000 genes arranged on 12 chromosomes. "For any characteristic of the tomato, whether it's taste, natural pest resistance or nutritional...

Genome Data From St. Jude's Children Hospital Aids Researchers
2012-05-30 05:58:52

Connie K. Ho for RedOrbit.com Like the old slogan says, sharing is caring. St. Jude´s Children´s Hospital and the Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project recently announced that it would share its comprehensive human cancer genome data for free access by the scientific community to be used in research regarding cancer and other diseases. The release of data is the largest-ever by an organization and the amount of information more than doubles the volume of...

Genome Mapping Of Crocodiles Could Aid In Species Conservation
2012-05-22 05:48:44

[ Watch the Video ] "If it can't bite you, it's not interesting,” jokes David Ray an evolutionary biologist at Mississippi State University (MSU). Ray and his team of researchers study alligators, crocodiles, flies, bats and other animals. Ray stated of the risky work, "Oh, it's great. I mean, there's just a thrill.” The team, comprised of researchers from many different universities, is undergoing studies on genome mapping of alligators and crocodiles, funded by the...

Scientists Gain Insights From Miscanthus Genome Maps
2012-05-16 08:07:00

Two reports were released this year on the genome of Miscanthus grasses, which are used in gardens, burned for energy and converted into liquid fuels. The first, led by the energy crop organization Ceres, appeared in the journal PLoS ONE; the second, from a team led by researchers at the University of Illinois, is in the journal BMC Genomics. The data, materials, methods and genetic markers used in the latter study are available to the public for further research. Scientists knew that...

LSU Research Finds Orangutans Host Ancient Jumping Genes
2012-05-07 14:34:59

LSU´s Mark Batzer, along with research associate Jerilyn Walker and assistant professor Miriam Konkel, have published research determining that modern-day orangutans are host to ancient jumping genes called Alu, which are more than 16 million years old. The study was done in collaboration with the Zoological Society of San Diego and the Institute of Systems Biology in Seattle and is featured in the new open access journal Mobile DNA. These tiny pieces of mobile DNA are able to copy...

2012-04-11 22:33:34

Findings provide tools for better understanding of the human genome Chromosomes are strands of DNA that contain the blueprint of all living organisms. Humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes that instruct how genes are regulated during development of the human body. While scientists have developed an understanding of the one-dimensional structure of DNA, until today, little was known about how different parts of DNA are folded next to each other inside the nucleus. Using a powerful DNA...

2012-04-09 21:45:09

First-of-its-kind discovery used revolutionary data crunching computer program running on 48 computer processors for 4 weeks to complete 32 billion searches Analyzing massive amounts of data officially became a national priority recently when the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy announced the Big Data Research and Development Initiative. A multi-disciplinary team of University of Missouri researchers rose to the big data challenge when they solved a major biological...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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