Quantcast

Latest Genetic mapping Stories

2014-04-30 09:46:46

In research published today in Molecular Psychiatry, a multinational team of scientists presents new evidence supporting the theory that in at least some cases of schizophrenia, autism and intellectual disability (ID), malfunctions in some of the same genes are contributing to pathology. The team, the product of an ongoing collaboration between Professors W. Richard McCombie of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) and Aiden Corvin of Trinity College, Dublin, studied a type of gene...

Golden Eagle Genome Could Lead To More Effective Conservation Strategies
2014-04-25 03:12:23

Purdue University Purdue and West Virginia University researchers are the first to sequence the genome of the golden eagle, providing a bird's-eye view of eagle features that could lead to more effective conservation strategies. Their study calls into question long-held assumptions about golden eagle vision, indicating that the raptors may not be as sensitive to ultraviolet light as previously thought. The genome also suggests that golden eagles could have a sharper sense of smell than...

2014-04-25 10:07:07

Scientists discover that modifications to the RNA of the powerhouses in each of your body's countless cells might be influencing your fitness Although our chromosomes are relatively stable within our lifetimes, the genetic material found in our mitochondria is highly variable across individuals and may impact upon human health, say researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital. Genomes are changing, not just from generation to generation, but even...

Rainbow Trout Genome Sequenced By International Team Of Researchers
2014-04-22 14:58:22

By Eric Sorensen, Washington State University Using fish bred at Washington State University, an international team of researchers has mapped the genetic profile of the rainbow trout, a versatile salmonid whose relatively recent genetic history opens a window into how vertebrates evolve. The 30-person team, led by Yann Guiguen of the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, reports its findings this week in Nature Communications. Recent doubling enables study The...

2014-04-22 14:14:58

The answer lies in changes in the way our genes work In parallel with modern man (Homo sapiens), there were other, extinct types of humans with whom we lived side by side, such as Neanderthals and the recently discovered Denisovans of Siberia. Yet only Homo sapiens survived. What was it in our genetic makeup that gave us the advantage? The truth is that little is known about our unique genetic makeup as distinguished from our archaic cousins, and how it contributed to the fact that we...

2014-04-22 08:29:11

Study Results Are Published in The American Journal of Human Genetics SALT LAKE CITY, April 22, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new computational tool developed at the University of Utah has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, University of Utah researchers and their colleagues report in The American Journal of Human Genetics. The software, Phevor (Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool), identifies undiagnosed...

2014-04-18 15:41:30

Researchers propose classification system revolutionizing communication of chromosomal abnormalities for research and clinical settings When talking about genetic abnormalities at the DNA level that occur when chromosomes swap, delete or add parts, there is an evolving communication gap both in the science and medical worlds, leading to inconsistencies in clinical and research reports. Now a study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) proposes a new classification system...

2014-04-08 11:51:42

From time to time, living cells will accidentally make an extra copy of a gene during the normal replication process. Throughout the history of life, evolution has molded some of these seemingly superfluous genes into a source of genetic novelty, adaptation and diversity. A new study shows one way that some duplicate genes could have long-ago escaped elimination from the genome, leading to the genetic innovation seen in modern life. Researchers have shown that a process called DNA...

2014-03-28 09:30:17

Researchers have pinpointed a new mechanism of how natural variation in our DNA alters an individual's risk for developing heart disease by interfering with the ability of a developmental gene to interact with a specialized type of RNA. This work expands on previous work identifying the "hidden" causes of complex disease risk, with the goal of unlocking new pathways and potential drug targets for cardiovascular disease. This latest study led by Thomas Quertermous, MD at Stanford University...

Atlas Of Human Gene Activity
2014-03-28 05:31:57

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have created the first detailed map of the way human genes work throughout major cells and tissues. Researchers working on the FANTOM5 project created a map that shows how a network of switches built within our DNA controls where and when our genes turn off and on. The three-year project included more than 250 scientists in over 20 countries and regions. "The FANTOM5 project is a tremendous achievement. To use the analogy...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.