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Latest Genetics of aggression Stories

Understanding How To Address Childhood Aggression
2014-01-21 08:41:15

University of Montreal The development of physical aggression in toddlers is strongly associated genetic factors and to a lesser degree with the environment, according to a new study led by Eric Lacourse of the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital. Lacourse's worked with the parents of identical and non-identical twins to evaluate and compare their behavior, environment and genetics. "The gene-environment analyses revealed that early genetic factors were...

2012-06-20 12:11:26

Understanding the biological basis of violent outbursts in mice could lead to treatments for antisocial and aggressive behavior Pathological rage can be blocked in mice, researchers have found, suggesting potential new treatments for severe aggression, a widespread trait characterized by sudden violence, explosive outbursts and hostile overreactions to stress. In a study appearing today in the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers from the University of Southern California and Italy...

2012-06-11 21:26:48

Study shows people who have lower levels of the brain chemical are more likely to be aggressive when provoked in competitive situations Out of control competitive aggression could be a result of a lagging neurotransmitter called dopamine, say researchers presenting a study at the Society of Nuclear Medicine's 2012 Annual Meeting. During a computer game against a putative cheating adversary, participants who had a lower capacity to synthesize this neurotransmitter in the brain were more...

2011-10-26 13:03:43

Children who have a good relationship with their teacher may be protected from expressing aggression and being the target of aggression at school. That's the key finding in a new study of Canadian first graders that appears in the journal Child Development. The study was conducted by researchers from the University of Quebec at Montreal, Laval University, the University of Alabama, the University of Montreal, and University College Dublin. "Aggressive behavior in middle childhood is at...

2011-09-27 11:18:54

For decades, laboratory mice have been widely used in research aimed at understanding which genes are involved in various illnesses. But actual variations in past gene sequences of mice were unknown. While researchers were able to determine that a variant affecting disease was in a certain region, they couldn't pinpoint the exact set of variants in that region. Now, in new research recently published in the journal Nature, an international team of investigators that included UCLA...

2006-06-28 12:21:49

By Charnicia Huggins NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Why are some men confrontational or break objects in fits of anger, while others appear to be more in control under similar circumstances? New study findings suggest the answer may involve genetic differences in combination with the men's early environment. A variation in a gene involved in the activity of the brain chemical serotonin, which is known to play an important role in regulating emotions and impulses, may cause some men to...

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2005-07-14 14:36:14

NEW YORK -- Children who ostracize or gossip about other kids have likely picked up that behavior from their peers, families or teachers, according to new study findings. In a study of identical and fraternal 6-year-old twins, a group of Quebec researchers found that approximately 60 percent of children's physical aggression - biting, hitting or slapping another child - is inherited. In contrast, only 20 percent of social aggression - more subtle forms of cruelty, such as gossiping, or...


Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'