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Human Face Are So Variable Because We Evolved To Look Unique

Human Face Are So Variable Because We Evolved To Look Unique

Robert Sanders, University of California - Berkeley The amazing variety of human faces – far greater than that of most other animals – is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a...

Latest Genome Stories

coffee genome
2014-09-06 05:03:21

Chuck Bednar for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online By sequencing the genome of the coffee plant, an international team of researchers has discovered genetic secrets that could enable them to create new varieties of coffee that taste better, have varied levels or caffeine, or are better able to survive drought conditions and diseases. In addition, Philippe Lashermes, a researcher at the French Institute of Research for Development (IRD), and his colleagues discovered that the coffee...

cicada
2014-09-01 02:10:59

John McCutcheon, The University of Montana Two is company, three is a crowd. But in the case of the cicada, that’s a good thing. Until a recent discovery by a University of Montana research lab, it was thought that cicadas had a symbiotic relationship with two important bacteria that live within the cells of its body. Since the insect eats a simple diet consisting solely of plant sap, it relies on these bacteria to produce the nutrients it needs for survival. In exchange, those two...

2014-08-29 23:03:39

A new way to quickly sequence genes of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug - developed by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Department of Entomology - could lead to new ways to control this abundant and costly pest. Baltimore, Maryland (PRWEB) August 29, 2014 Investigators at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the University of Maryland Department of Entomology have used a...

2014-08-28 12:29:30

PORTLAND, Oregon, August 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The new report by Allied Market Research titled, "DNA diagnostics Market (products, applications, techniques, end users and Geography) Global Size, Industry Analysis, Trends, Opportunities, Growth and Forecast, 2013 - 2020," indicates that the global DNA diagnostics market would reach $19 billion by 2020 registering a CAGR of 9.8% from 2014 to 2020. The potential to provide accurate diagnosis and cost effectiveness over...

Hybrid poplar trees
2014-08-26 02:45:23

David Gilbert, DOE/Joint Genome Institute One aspect of the climate change models researchers have been developing looks at how plant ranges might shift, and how factors such as temperature, water availability, and light levels might come into play. Forests creeping steadily north and becoming established in the thawing Arctic is just one of the predicted effects of rising global temperatures. A recent study published online August 24, 2014 in Nature Genetics offers a more in-depth,...

Generating A Genome To Feed The World
2014-07-30 03:50:10

By Shelley Littin, University of Arizona An international team of scientists led by the UA has sequenced the genome of African rice. The genetic information will enhance scientists' and agriculturalists' understanding of the growing patterns of African rice, as well as enable the development of new rice varieties that are better able to cope with increasing environmental stressors to help solve global hunger challenges. The paper, "The genome sequence of African rice (Oryza...

Genome Of Stress-tolerant Tomato Relative Sequenced
2014-07-30 03:56:37

By Andy Fell, UC Davis The genome of Solanum pennellii, a wild relative of the domestic tomato, has been published by an international group of researchers including the labs headed by Professors Neelima Sinha and Julin Maloof at the UC Davis Department of Plant Biology. The new genome information may help breeders produce tastier, more stress-tolerant tomatoes. The work, published July 27 in the journal Nature Genetics, was lead by Björn Usadel and colleagues at Aachen University in...

common marmoset genome
2014-07-22 03:45:07

Glenna Picton, Baylor College of Medicine A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset – the first sequence of a New World Monkey – providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. The team published the work today in the journal Nature Genetics....

Viral Relics Reveal Cancer's 'Footprint' On Our Evolution
2014-07-21 03:57:19

University of Oxford Cancer has left its ‘footprint’ on our evolution, according to a study which examined how the relics of ancient viruses are preserved in the genomes of 38 mammal species. Viral relics are evidence of the ancient battles our genes have fought against infection. Occasionally the retroviruses that infect an animal get incorporated into that animal’s genome and sometimes these relics get passed down from generation to generation – termed ‘endogenous...

wheat genome draft sequence
2014-07-18 06:07:57

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An international team of researchers has successfully completed the chromosome-based draft of the bread wheat genome, giving them the first-ever genetic blueprint of the crop grown on over 500 million acres worldwide and used to produce nearly 700 million tons of food annually. The group, which is known as the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC), managed to produce an ordered draft sequence of the 17-gigabase...


Latest Genome Reference Libraries

Northern Greater Galago, Otolemur garnettii
2012-05-29 12:39:27

The northern greater galago (Otolemur garnettii), also called Garnett's greater galago, is native to Africa. This species is important to genetic research because of the low genomic sequence, completed in 2006, that makes it possible to bridge the genome sequence of higher primates like chimps, and non-primate species like rodents. However, the small 2x genome is not large enough to be a complete genome. The northern greater galago has been given a conservation status of “Least Concern”...

0_e67c1a37f04af347aba9326018efe9b5
2011-01-11 09:41:24

Coccolithovirus, a giant double-stranded DNA virus, infects Emiliania huxleyi, a species of coccolithophore. The virus was first observed in 1999 by W.H. Wilson and his team at the Marine Biological Association. It was sequenced for the EhV-86 strain during the summer of 2005, and was found to be a "giant-virus" having 472 protein-coding genes. It is the largest known marine virus by genome.

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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