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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 0:02 EDT

Latest Genomic imprinting Stories

2014-04-10 11:22:17

Are babies who wake to breastfeed at night trying to delay the birth of a sibling? In a new article published online today in the journal Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health, Professor David Haig argues that infants that wake frequently at night to breastfeed are delaying the resumption of the mother's ovulation and therefore preventing the birth of a sibling with whom they would have to compete. It has already been documented that smaller gaps between the births of siblings are...

2014-02-20 12:23:31

Gerber grant funds Franciscan St. Francis Health neonatologist-led research INDIANAPOLIS, Feb. 20, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Do commonly used chemicals in the environment imprint our babies' DNA? Can they be linked to premature birth, birth defects and other adverse outcomes? Can they induce -- as they do in animals - diseases which appear later in life and are heritable across multiple generations? That's the focus of a study under way at Franciscan St. Francis...

2014-01-10 10:44:18

Single cell analysis captures a genomic phenomenon that fuels the complexity and diversity of living things A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a phenomenon that alters prevailing views of how the genome is expressed to make and sustain the life of mammals. Published in the journal Science, the paper helps explain why genetically identical animals are sometimes so different in their biology and appearance, and why some inherited disorders caused by a shared set of aberrant genes...

Veil Of Ignorance Is Sometimes Bliss
2013-10-24 08:22:27

Washington University in St. Louis A range of examples suggests a lack of information about their fellows can favor cooperation and prevent conflict among animals — and even among genes For the Oct. 16 issue of Biology Letters, a special issue commemorating the 50th anniversary of W.D. Hamilton’s famous paper on kin selection, two Washington University in St. Louis biologists contributed an article describing intriguing exceptions to one of his predictions. The basic idea of...

2013-09-30 10:17:55

As so many genome studies do, this study published online in the journal Nature Genetics began with a single patient and his parents who were in search of a diagnosis. The parents of this first patient sought genetic testing for Prader-Willi syndrome when he was only a year old, but the test, which was still in its infancy, came back negative. For the next 12 years, his parents were left in limbo. He had many features of the disease – including lack of muscle tone, feeding difficulties...

2013-08-06 09:06:55

UC Davis researchers have identified how and where in the genome a cancer chemotherapy agent acts on and 'un-silences' the epigenetically silenced gene that causes Angelman syndrome, a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability, seizures, motor impairments, and laughing and smiling. The agent, Topotecan, is a topoisomerase inhibitor, part of a class of drugs that in earlier research has been found to un-silence the Angelman gene, suggesting that it...

2013-08-05 23:01:54

UC Davis researchers have identified how and where in the genome a cancer chemotherapy agent acts on and ‘un-silences’ the epigenetically silenced gene that causes Angelman syndrome, a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability, seizures, motor impairments, and laughing and smiling. Sacramento, CA (PRWEB) August 05, 2013 UC Davis researchers have identified how and where in the genome a cancer chemotherapy agent acts on and ‘un-silences’ the...

2013-07-01 19:04:54

Canadian-led study will help scientists identify key genomic regions in canola, other food plants What allows certain plants to survive freezing and thrive in the Canadian climate, while others are sensitive to the slightest drop in temperature? Those that flourish activate specific genes at just the right time -- but the way gene activation is controlled remains poorly understood. A major step forward in understanding this process lies in a genomic map produced by an international...

2013-06-10 12:27:51

A study led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital shows epigenetic changes that turn genes on and off are as unique as alterations in DNA and may be as important in causing the most common childhood cancer MEMPHIS, Tenn., June 10, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Changes in an epigenetic mechanism that turns expression of genes on and off may be as important as genetic alterations in causing pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), according to a study led by scientists...

2013-02-06 12:20:26

A father's obesity is one factor that may influence his children's health and potentially raise their risk for diseases like cancer, according to new research from Duke Medicine. The study, which appears Feb. 6 in the journal BMC Medicine, is the first in humans to show that paternal obesity may alter a genetic mechanism in the next generation, suggesting that a father's lifestyle factors may be transmitted to his children. "Understanding the risks of the current Western lifestyle on...