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Latest Geochemistry Stories

Carbon-sequestering Ocean Plants May Handle Climate Changes Over The Long Run
2013-08-26 14:33:35

San Francisco State University A year-long experiment on tiny ocean organisms called coccolithophores suggests that the single-celled algae may still be able to grow their calcified shells even as oceans grow warmer and more acidic in Earth's near future. The study stands in contrast to earlier studies suggesting that coccolithophores would fail to build strong shells in acidic waters. The world's oceans are expected to become more acidic as human activities pump increasing amounts of...

Animal Species Ocean Acidification
2013-08-26 09:36:17

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online When atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolves into the ocean, it forms carbonic acid, which in turn lowers the water's pH levels and causes oceanic acidification. The phenomenon is expected to occur at increasing rates as carbon dioxide emissions around the world continue to rise. In a report published in Nature Climate Change, two researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz-Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) in...

New Variability In Iron Supply To The Oceans With Climate Implications Discovered By Scientists
2013-07-19 09:44:51

National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (UK) The supply of dissolved iron to oceans around continental shelves has been found to be more variable by region than previously believed -- with implications for future climate prediction. Iron is key to the removal of carbon dioxide from the Earth's atmosphere as it promotes the growth of microscopic marine plants (phytoplankton), which mop up the greenhouse gas and lock it away in the ocean. A new study, led by researchers based at the...

Ocean Acidification Has Transformed Delicate Ecosystem
2013-07-09 15:43:58

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While many studies have focused on how ocean acidification may impact various individual species, an international team of researchers has just published a study on how an entire ecosystem can be affected by a more acidic ocean. As one of the consequences of climate change, ocean acidification is expected to significantly increase if carbon emissions continue at current rates. According to the study, which was published in...


Latest Geochemistry Reference Libraries

28_0d277ca2b0d8b8cd79fb9cfa322f77e1
2005-05-26 11:01:52

Diorite is a grey to dark grey intermediate intrusive igneous rock composed principally of plagioclase feldspar (typically andesine), hornblende, and/or pyroxene. Varieties deficient in hornblende and other dark minerals are called leucodiorite. It is often described as "salt and pepper" when composed largely of light-colored minerals randomly interspersed with dark minerals. When olivine and more iron-rich augite are present, the rock grades into ferrodiorite, which is transitional to...

28_30e95d7bc9a84ffe78f930c8704eb5b2
2005-05-26 11:00:22

Gabbro is a dark, coarse-grained, intrusive igneous rock chemically equivalent to basalt. It is a plutonic rock, formed when molten magma is trapped beneath the Earth's surface and cools slowly into a hard, coarsely crystalline mass. It is dense, greenish or dark-colored and contains varied percentages of plagioclase feldspar, pyroxene, amphibole, and olivine (called olivine gabbro when olivine is present in large quantities). Quartz gabbros are also known to occur and are probably derived...

28_c04342a5025a8ae7a0de88f6dc83278c
2005-05-25 11:55:01

Syenite is a coarse-grained intrusive igneous rock of the same general composition as granite but with the quartz either absent or present in relatively small amounts. The feldspars are alkaline in character and the dark mineral is usually hornblende. Soda-lime feldspars may be present in small quantities. The term syenite was originally applied to hornblende granite like that of Syene in Egypt, from which the name is derived. Syenite is not a common rock, some of the more important...

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Word of the Day
conjunto
  • A style of popular dance music originating along the border between Texas and Mexico, characterized by the use of accordion, drums, and 12-string bass guitar and traditionally based on polka, waltz, and bolero rhythms.
The word 'conjunto' comes through Spanish, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin