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Latest Geochronology Stories

Antarctic Glacial Melt May Be Natural
2013-04-15 11:05:27

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As the debate over climate change continues, so does the publication of studies that support or challenge the notion that human activity is the main driver of rising temperatures. According to a new study in“¯Nature Geoscience, the dramatic thinning of glaciers in Western Antarctica is due to natural variation, and cannot be attributed directly to carbon emissions. "If we could look back at this region of Antarctica in...

Peruvian Ice Cores Reveal History Of Earth's Tropical Climate
2013-04-05 13:11:38

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Earth's tropical climate history has been revealed in unprecedented detail — year by year, for almost 1,800 years — by two annually dated ice cores drawn from the tropical Peruvian Andes. In 2003, a research team led by Ohio State University retrieved core samples from a Peruvian ice cap. They noticed some startling similarities to ice cores they had gathered from Tibet and the Himalayas. Even though the cores were taken...

2013-02-28 16:22:53

In the March issue of GSA Today, seven scientists from six countries, led by Jan Zalasiewicz of the University of Leicester, propose a realignment of the terms "geochronology" and "chronostratigraphy" in an attempt to resolve the debate of whether units of the Geological Time Scale should have a single (time) or dual (time and time-rock) hierarchy. In their system, which retains both parallel sets of units, with an option to adopt one or other when appropriate, geochronology refers to all...

Greenland Ice Core Research Points To Higher Seas, Warmer Past
2013-01-24 11:07:31

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research findings based on Greenland ice cores show that if climate change patterns repeat themselves, the Earth will become much warmer and sea levels will rise significantly. In a new report published in the latest edition of the journal Nature, scientists have used Greenland ice cores over 1.5 miles long to collect data on the Eemian period, around 115 to 130 thousand years ago. An analysis of the cores allowed the international...

Significant Technological Milestones Reached By Trio of Complex Antarctic Science Projects
2012-12-21 13:38:46

National Science Foundation Drilling-related breakthroughs funded by NSF expected to advance "frontier science" in a variety of disciplines Three very large-scale, National Science Foundation-funded Antarctic science projects--investigating scientifically significant subjects as varied as life in extreme ecosystems, the fate of one of the world's largest ice sheets and the nature of abrupt global climate-change events--have recently each reached important technological milestones that...

Earth's Magnetic Field And Maori Stones
2012-12-09 06:12:00

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Maori of New Zealand have been cooking in earth ovens, called hangi or umu, since at least the 1200s. These ovens are fire pits, scooped out of the ground. A fire is built and large volcanic stones are laid over the fire. When the fire burns down, the food is wrapped in leaves, placed in baskets and laid on the rocks with wet fern fronds. A layer of earth is scraped over the food, sealing in the heat and steam. The stones inside...

2012-10-19 16:58:40

Annual strata in the Japanese Lake Suigetsu enable a more accurate calibration of radiocarbon datings By using a new series of measurements of radiocarbon dates on seasonally laminated sediments from Lake Suigetsu in Japan, a more precise calibration of radiocarbon dating will be possible. In combination with an accurate count of the seasonal layered deposits in the lake, the study resulted in an unprecedented precision of the known 14C method with which it is now possible to date older...


Latest Geochronology Reference Libraries

Tenontosaurus
2013-01-29 09:53:30

Image Caption: Head of Tenontosaurus, Institut de paléontologie humaine, Paris, France. Credit: Rémih/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) Tenontosaurus, meaning “sinew lizard”, is a genus of medium to large sized ornithopod dinosaur. The genus is known from the late Aptian to Albian ages of the middle Cretaceious period sediments of western North America, dating roughly between 115 to 108 million years ago. It was formerly thought to be a ‘hypsilophodont’, but since Hypsilophodontia is no...

Sharpirhynchia sharpi
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Sharpirhynchia sharpi is a species of extinct brachiopod named after fossil collector Samuel Sharp (1814-1882). This species lived during the Lower Bathonian of the Middle Jurassic Period. It is found only in the United Kingdom, and numerous specimens have been taken from several sites, the first from Limekiln Quarry in Northampton, England. S. sharpi is roughly a half-inch long, with a slender beak and 21 to 31 ribs fanning out from the hinge. This lampshell brachiopod lived life as a...

794px-Sauroposeidon_protheles_1
2012-03-21 22:48:02

Sauroposeidon, meaning “earthquake god lizard,” is a genus of sauropods dinosaur from the Aptian and Albian ages of the Early Cretaceous Period (110 million years ago). It was discovered in the southeast region of Atoka County, Oklahoma, not far from the border of Texas, in a claystone outcrop. The fossils were initially misidentified as pieces of petrified wood when they were found in 1994. A more detailed analysis in 1999 revealed they were truly dinosaurian bones. They were formally...

0_13e03c979de918ad3bf95cb5bde79152
2011-01-03 18:03:01

Qiaowanlong is a genus of sauropod dinosaur from the Albian stage of the Early Cretaceous Period (100 million years ago). It was discovered in the Yujinzi Basin of Gansu, China in 2007. It came from the geological formation called the Xinminpu Group. Qiaowanlong is known from articulated cervical (neck) vertebrae and a right pelvic girdle, as well as several unidentified bone fragments. It was the first brachiosaurid to have been found from China. Qiaowanlong is estimated to have been...

0_5c6e9eeba97c306c5fb67de29a192816
2011-01-03 17:56:44

Qantassaurus is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur from the late Aptian to early Albian age of the Early Cretaceous Period (115 million years ago). It lived in Australia when the continent was still south of the Antarctic Circle, and was still part of the supercontinent Gondwana. Qantassaurus was discovered in 1996 during the third annual field season of the Dinosaur Dreaming Project, a dig jointly run by Monash University and Museum Victoria. It was found in the intertidal site known as Flat...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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