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Latest Geochronology Stories

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2010-04-12 13:09:31

Researchers here are hopeful that the new core they drilled through an ice field on the Antarctic Peninsula will contain ice dating back into the last ice age.  If so, that record should give new insight into past global climate changes. The expedition in early winter to the Bruce Plateau, an ice field straddling a narrow ridge on the northernmost tongue of the southernmost continent, yielded a core that was 445.6 meters (1,462 feet) long, the longest yet recovered from that region of...

2010-03-22 16:45:56

The Early Aptian (120 million years ago) was an age of intense volcanic activity on Earth, eruptions that emitted large amounts of CO2 into the atmosphere, thus causing a revolution in the carbon cycle. As a consequence, great changes happened in the whole of the terrestrial system. Researcher María Isabel Millán has studied how these changes happened in the marine environment of the Aralar mountain range (at that time it was under the sea) in the Basque Country, and...

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2009-12-04 08:15:11

Isotope analysis provides accurate information The analysis of carbon and oxygen isotopes embedded in tree rings may shed new light on past climate events in the Mackenzie Delta region of northern Canada. Scientists have long looked at the width of tree rings to estimate temperature levels of past years. Larger rings indicate more tree growth in a season, which translates into warmer summer temperatures. But the analysis of carbon and oxygen isotopes in tree rings can also provide accurate...

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2009-11-30 10:42:06

In the film, "ËœThe Day After Tomorrow' the world enters the icy grip of a new glacial period within the space of just a few weeks. Now new research shows that this scenario may not be so far from the truth after all. William Patterson, from the University of Saskatchewan in Canada, and his colleagues have shown that switching off the North Atlantic circulation can force the Northern hemisphere into a mini "Ëœice age' in a matter of months. Previous work has indicated that...

ebf1464f777841062d377fde4ab863081
2009-11-20 08:15:00

A new study of Antarctica's past climate reveals that temperatures during the warm periods between ice ages may have been higher than previously thought A new study of Antarctica's past climate reveals that temperatures during the warm periods between ice ages (interglacials) may have been higher than previously thought. The latest analysis of ice core records suggests that Antarctic temperatures may have been up to 6°C warmer than the present day. The findings, reported this week by...

e9f22c880e44bd0589c6aace7109744a
2009-11-02 14:37:09

Researchers spent two months this summer high in the Peruvian Andes and brought back two cores, the longest ever drilled from ice fields in the tropics. Ohio State glaciologist Lonnie Thompson said that this latest expedition focused on a yet-to-be-named ice field 5,364 meters (17,598 feet) above sea level in the Cordillera Blanca mountain range. The researchers hiked to a col, or saddle, between two adjacent peaks "“ Hualcán and Copa "“ set up camp and used a ground sensing...

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2009-10-20 08:12:07

In 2007 alone, it lost volume equivalent to draining San Francisco Bay every week Not that long ago "“ the blink of a geologic eye "“ global temperatures were so warm that ice on Greenland could have been hard to come by. Today, the largest island in the world is covered with ice 1.6 miles thick. Even so, Greenland has become a hot spot for climate scientists. Why? Because tiny bubbles trapped in the ice layers may help resolve a fundamental question about global warming: how fast...

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2009-10-20 07:55:00

An analysis of sediment cores indicates that biological and chemical changes occurring at a remote Arctic lake are unprecedented over the past 200,000 years and likely are the result of human-caused climate change, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. While environmental changes at the lake over the past millennia have been shown to be tightly linked with natural causes of climate change -- like periodic, well-understood wobbles in Earth's orbit -- changes...

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2009-09-28 14:35:00

Scientists are taking a more in-depth view of how climate change could affect Antarctica's ice, and how even a small change in temperature could lead to a global rise in sea levels. "If you're going to have even a few meters it will change the geography of the planet," Rajendra Pachauri, head of the U.N.'s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) told Reuters. "Greenland and Antarctica are two huge bodies of ice sitting on land that could really have very serious implications for the...

1abe930c26165d356ce926b108f63c191
2009-09-16 14:13:06

Will all of the ice on Greenland melt and flow out into the sea, bringing about a colossal rise in ocean levels on Earth, as the global temperature rises? The key concern is how stable the ice cap actually is and new Danish research from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen can now show the evolution of the ice sheet 11,700 years back in time "“ all the way back to the start of our current warm period. The results are published in the esteemed journal Nature....


Latest Geochronology Reference Libraries

Tenontosaurus
2013-01-29 09:53:30

Image Caption: Head of Tenontosaurus, Institut de paléontologie humaine, Paris, France. Credit: Rémih/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) Tenontosaurus, meaning “sinew lizard”, is a genus of medium to large sized ornithopod dinosaur. The genus is known from the late Aptian to Albian ages of the middle Cretaceious period sediments of western North America, dating roughly between 115 to 108 million years ago. It was formerly thought to be a ‘hypsilophodont’, but since Hypsilophodontia is no...

Sharpirhynchia sharpi
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Sharpirhynchia sharpi is a species of extinct brachiopod named after fossil collector Samuel Sharp (1814-1882). This species lived during the Lower Bathonian of the Middle Jurassic Period. It is found only in the United Kingdom, and numerous specimens have been taken from several sites, the first from Limekiln Quarry in Northampton, England. S. sharpi is roughly a half-inch long, with a slender beak and 21 to 31 ribs fanning out from the hinge. This lampshell brachiopod lived life as a...

794px-Sauroposeidon_protheles_1
2012-03-21 22:48:02

Sauroposeidon, meaning “earthquake god lizard,” is a genus of sauropods dinosaur from the Aptian and Albian ages of the Early Cretaceous Period (110 million years ago). It was discovered in the southeast region of Atoka County, Oklahoma, not far from the border of Texas, in a claystone outcrop. The fossils were initially misidentified as pieces of petrified wood when they were found in 1994. A more detailed analysis in 1999 revealed they were truly dinosaurian bones. They were formally...

0_13e03c979de918ad3bf95cb5bde79152
2011-01-03 18:03:01

Qiaowanlong is a genus of sauropod dinosaur from the Albian stage of the Early Cretaceous Period (100 million years ago). It was discovered in the Yujinzi Basin of Gansu, China in 2007. It came from the geological formation called the Xinminpu Group. Qiaowanlong is known from articulated cervical (neck) vertebrae and a right pelvic girdle, as well as several unidentified bone fragments. It was the first brachiosaurid to have been found from China. Qiaowanlong is estimated to have been...

0_5c6e9eeba97c306c5fb67de29a192816
2011-01-03 17:56:44

Qantassaurus is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur from the late Aptian to early Albian age of the Early Cretaceous Period (115 million years ago). It lived in Australia when the continent was still south of the Antarctic Circle, and was still part of the supercontinent Gondwana. Qantassaurus was discovered in 1996 during the third annual field season of the Dinosaur Dreaming Project, a dig jointly run by Monash University and Museum Victoria. It was found in the intertidal site known as Flat...

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Word of the Day
negawatt
  • A unit of saved energy.
Coined by Amory Lovins, chairman of the Rocky Mountain Institute as a contraction of negative watt on the model of similar compounds like megawatt.