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Latest Geography of Antarctica Stories

Climate Change Affects Chinstrap Penguins In The Antarctic
2012-11-07 05:49:57

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research, partially funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), shows that the breeding population of chinstrap penguins has significantly declined as temperatures have increased on the Antarctic Peninsula. Changing climatic conditions, rather than the impact of tourism, has the greatest effect on the chinstrap population. The findings of this study, conducted by a research team with the Antarctic Site Inventory (ASI), have...

Composition Of Microbial Populations Determined By Freshwater Flows Into The Arctic And Southern Oceans
2012-10-11 08:05:22

Part of NSF's International Polar Year research portfolio, the six-nation study indicates that shallow-water populations have little in common Differing contributions of freshwater from glaciers and streams to the Arctic and Southern oceans appear to be responsible for the fact that the majority of microbial communities that thrive near the surface at the Poles share few common members, according to an international team of researchers, some of whom were supported by the National Science...

Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse Has Been Occurring For 600 Years, Manmade Climate Change Is Now Adding To Problem
2012-08-23 10:53:35

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Antarctic Peninsula has been continually shrinking for centuries, since long before the Industrial Revolution, according to an international team of researchers. However, rapid warming over the past 100 years has been unusual and, if it continues, the ice shelf could be on par for a complete collapse. Temperatures in the Antarctic Peninsula began rising around 600 years ago, occurring naturally. This was long before manmade...

Satellite Observes Rapid Ice Shelf Disintegration In Antarctic
2012-04-06 04:16:49

As ESA´s Envisat satellite marks ten years in orbit, it continues to observe the rapid retreat of one of Antarctica´s ice shelves due to climate warming. One of the satellite´s first observations following its launch on 1 March 2002 was of break-up of a main section of the Larsen B ice shelf in Antarctica — when 3200 sq km of ice disintegrated within a few days due to mechanical instabilities of the ice masses triggered by climate warming. Now, with ten years of...

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2011-05-30 08:29:58

Thirty-eight million years ago, tropical jungles thrived in what are now the cornfields of the American Midwest and furry marsupials wandered temperate forests in what is now the frozen Antarctic. The temperature differences of that era, known as the late Eocene, between the equator and Antarctica were half what they are today. A debate has been ongoing in the scientific community about what changes in our global climate system led to such a major shift from the more tropical, greenhouse...

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2011-04-12 05:40:00

Young penguins in the Antarctic may be dying for lack of food, as melting sea ice reduces the numbers of small fish they consume as their primary food source, according to a new study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The researchers found that just 10 percent of baby penguins tagged are returning in two to four years to breed, a drop of 40-50 percent since the 1970s. The study indicates that species often considered likely "winners" of climate...

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2010-10-31 08:20:00

An Indian mission leader said Saturday that the country will have its first scientific expedition to the South Pole on Monday to analyze environmental changes in the frozen continent over the past 1,000 years. Rasik Ravindra, head of the National Center for Antarctic and Ocean Research, is going to lead the team of seven Indian scientists on the 40-day expedition from an Indian research base in the Antarctic to the South Pole. "No one has taken the route we will be taking to the South Pole,"...

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2010-08-26 06:47:16

Personal effects and science equipment belonging to a physicist who accompanied Captain Robert Falcon Scott on his ill-fated expedition to Antarctica will be put up for sale in London next month, Christie's auctioneers announced Wednesday. Canadian scientist Charles Seymour Wright was part of the support team that set off with Captain Scott's 1910 expedition. Wright turned back after a year, leaving Scott and four others to continue to the South Pole. Nearly a year later, when Scott failed...

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2009-04-17 06:55:00

Scientists have once again found cause to marvel at the brilliant tenacity of life. In a small subterranean pool of highly concentrated salt water that hasn't seen the sun for some 1.5 million years, researchers have discovered flourishing colonies of previously unknown species microbes. The red water of Blood Falls that flows from the base of the Taylor Glacier in Antarctica has intrigued scientists since its discovery more than a century ago. A crew of scientists from Harvard and Dartmouth...

2008-12-07 11:40:59

British television host Bear Grylls was airlifted out of Antarctica after breaking his shoulder while filming a television documentary, the Mail on Sunday said. The newspaper reported Grylls' insurance company had arranged for a private air ambulance to fly him to South Africa Saturday night for treatment of the compound fracture. Grylls, a 34-year-old former British military commando, apparently took a bad fall while taking part in a cross-country trek to a mountain peak near the South...


Latest Geography of Antarctica Reference Libraries

Antarctic Silverfish, Pleuragramma antarcticum
2012-04-02 17:14:35

The Antarctic Silverfish, (Pleuragramma antarcticum), is a member of the Notothenioidei family of fish. It is widely distributed around the Antarctic, but has largely disappeared from the western side of the northern Antarctic Peninsula based on 2010 research funded by the National Science Foundation. It is also found throughout the Southern Ocean. It grows to an average size of 6 inches, but has been known to reach lengths of up to 10 inches. It is usually pink with a silver tint, and...

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2009-05-14 17:45:56

The Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station is a U.S. research facility based at the South Pole, in Antarctica. It is the southernmost continually inhabited place on the planet. Its name honors Roald Amundsen who reached the South Pole in December 1911, and Robert F. Scott who reached the South Pole in January 1912. The station was constructed in 1956 to support the International Geophysical Year in 1957. It has been continuously occupied since then. It currently lies within 330 feet of the...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'