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Latest Geological history of Earth Stories

Comet May Have Caused Chicxulub Crater And Dinosaur Extinction
2013-03-24 05:34:56

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the most popular theories on the disappearance of the dinosaurs surrounds the 110 mile-wide Chicxulub crater in Mexico. Many scientists believe the extinction was caused by an asteroid that crashed into Earth, leaving only a massive crater behind. However, a group of American scientists is presenting a theory that the culprit was actually a speeding comet, not a relatively slow-moving asteroid as many theories assert....

Inner Earth Could Have Caused Ancient Climate Change
2013-03-18 19:47:05

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers wrote in a newspaper published by the American Geophysical Union that Earth's interior cycles have contributed to long-term sea-level rises and climate change. New York University and Ottawa's Carleton University scientists say activity below the earth's surface has played a role before in ancient rises in sea levels and global warming. Although it may seem like welcoming news for climate change skeptics, the authors...

2012-12-19 11:26:08

An Australian technology company is close to commercializing the world´s first fully automated system for mustering and managing cattle in the rangelands. Alice Springs-based Precision Pastoral Pty Ltd has developed the Remote Livestock Management System (RLMS), which can save cattle producers around $68 a head in annual cattle operational costs and help them ensure their businesses have a strong economic future The Australian Government has announced it will provide a $350,000...

Cretaceous Extinction Worsened By Ecosystem Structures
2012-10-30 04:17:18

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A mass extinction, wiping out numerous species including the dinosaurs, marked the end of the Cretaceous Period. A new study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), reveals that the structure of North American ecosystems made the extinction worse than it might have been. Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula is home to the now-buried Chicxulub impact crater, caused by a mountain-sized asteroid. This impact is...

Oxygen's Rise And Fall In The Early Atmosphere And Ocean
2012-10-23 20:44:52

UC Riverside-led research team finds evidence for a dramatic rise in early oxygen about 2.3 billion years ago followed, more surprisingly, by an equally impressive fall Most researchers imagine the initial oxygenation of the ocean and atmosphere to have been something like a staircase, but with steps only going up. The first step, so the story goes, occurred around 2.4 billion years ago, and this, the so-called Great Oxidation Event, has obvious implications for the origins and evolution...

Climate Change May Have Positive Impact On Some Desert Plants
2012-10-10 09:15:25

Some plants in arid regions benefit from climate change Dryland ecosystems cover 41% of the Earth´s land surface. These ecosystems are highly vulnerable to global environmental change and desertification. But climate change seems to have a positive impact on some plants. A study involving the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research in Rostock has come to this conclusion. Using demographic methods, ecologist Roberto Salguero-Gómez investigates desert plants to...

Melting Mantle Linked To Great Oxygenation Event 2.5 Billion Years Ago
2012-05-25 04:38:16

Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com Oxygen-based life evolved on Earth because of geological events that occurred over 2.5 million years ago, according to Princeton University researchers who published a report this week in the online journal Nature. Based on geological evidence, scientists know that roughly 2.5 billion years ago, oxygen levels in the atmosphere exploded and eventually gave birth to our present atmosphere. This time period, dubbed the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE), appears to...

Image 1 - When Continents Collide
2012-03-01 09:00:58

A new twist to a 50 million-year-old tale Fifty million years ago, India slammed into Eurasia, a collision that gave rise to the tallest landforms on the planet, the Himalaya Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau. India and Eurasia continue to converge today, though at an ever-slowing pace. University of Michigan geomorphologist and geophysicist Marin Clark wanted to know when this motion will end and why. She conducted a study that led to surprising findings that could add a new wrinkle to...

0dd19548c1288b724f97e5ac94f22798
2011-05-15 09:43:23

More than 200 million years ago, mammals and reptiles lived in their own separate worlds on the supercontinent Pangaea, despite little geographical incentive to do so. Mammals lived in areas of twice-yearly seasonal rainfall; reptiles stayed in areas where rains came just once a year. Mammals lose more water when they excrete, and thus need water-rich environments to survive. Results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Aggregating nearly the entire landmass of...


Latest Geological history of Earth Reference Libraries

Rainforests
2013-04-19 19:33:20

Rainforests are forests that are characterized by high levels of rainfall, with definitions based on a minimum usual annual rainfall of about 68 to 78 inches. The monsoon trough, or otherwise known as the intertropical convergence zone, holds an important role in producing the climatic conditions that are essential for the Earth’s tropical rainforests. About 40 to 75 percent of all biotic species are native to the rainforests. It’s been estimated that there might be many millions of...

Desertification
2013-04-02 09:46:56

Desertification is a form of land degradation in which a comparatively dry land area becomes more and more arid, normally losing its bodies of water along with its wildlife and vegetation. This is a result of a variety of factors, such as climate change and human activities. Desertification is an important global, ecological, and environmental issue. There is substantial controversy over the proper definition of the term “desertification”. The most broadly accepted of these is that of...

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-11-18 19:08:04

The Paleoproterozoic is the first of three subdivisions of the Proterozoic Eon (occurring from 2.5 billion to 1.6 billion years ago (Ga). This period is marked by the first stabilization of the continents, and also when cyanobacteria--a type of bacteria that uses biochemical processes of photosynthesis to produce oxygen--evolved. Experts have found paleontological evidence that during at least part of the Paleoproterozoic era, about 1.8 Ga, the earth year was about 450 days long, with days...

Geologic Clock With Events And Periods
2012-10-22 14:17:38

The Archean (formerly Archaeozoic) is a geologic eon between the Hadean and Proterozoic eons. The Archean Eon begins at roughly 3.8 billion years ago (Ga) and ends at about 2.5 Ga. But unlike all other geological ages, which are based on stratigraphy, The Archean eon is defined chronometrically. The lower boundary of 3.8 Ga has also not been officially recognized by the International Commission on Stratigraphy. The name Archean is derived from the ancient Greek (Arkhe), meaning...

Volcano_q
2012-06-26 19:51:17

The Hadean is the unofficial geological period of time that lies just before the Archean time period. The Hadean began with the formation of the Earth roughly 4.5 billion years ago (Ga) and ended about 3.8 Ga; the latter date varies according to different sources. Hadean is derived from Hades, Greek for “underworld,” referring to the hellish conditions on the planet at the time. The term was coined in 1972 by geologist Preston Cloud. The period was later classified as the “Priscoan...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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