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Latest Geology of Mars Stories

Forces Of Martian Nature
2014-07-11 03:24:38

ESA The surface of Mars is pocked and scarred with giant impact craters and rocky ridges, as shown in this new image from ESA’s Mars Express that borders the giant Hellas basin in the planet’s southern hemisphere. The Hellas basin, some 2300 km across, is the largest visible impact structure in the Solar System, covering the equivalent of just under half the land area of Brazil. The images presented here were taken on 13 January 2014 by the high-resolution stereo camera on Mars...

Martian Geology More Diverse Than Thought
2013-11-18 13:23:57

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For years, scientists have thought of Mars as being made up of just one kind of rock – a very simplistic planet compared to the diverse geology of Earth. However, a new study in the journal Nature Geoscience suggests there may be granite on Mars and puts forward a theory for how it could have formed there. "We're providing the most compelling evidence to date that Mars has granitic rocks," said study author James Wray, an...

Images Beneath Mars Surface
2013-08-12 12:09:33

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A newly released image from the European Space Agency (ESA) offered a groundbreaking peek under the surface of Mars courtesy of the international agency’s Mars Express orbiter. Using ground penetrating radar, the spacecraft was able to image the composition of Mars several miles below the surface, revealing various layers of ice, dust and rock. The image essentially revealed a 3,500-mile slice through the planet’s southern...

Mars Double Layered Craters Are The Result Of Impactors And Ice
2013-08-06 04:16:26

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The over 600 double-layer ejecta (DLE) craters on Mars resulted because the planet's surface was covered by a thick sheet of ice during the time of impact, geologists from Brown University have discovered. According to David Kutai Weiss, a graduate student at the Providence, Rhode Island school, and geological science professor James W. Head, DLEs - like most craters - are surrounded by debris that is excavated when an asteroid or...

Underground Explosions Responsible For Pits Inside Twin Craters On Mars
2013-04-11 11:32:25

ESA Dramatic underground explosions, perhaps involving ice, are responsible for the pits inside these two large martian impact craters, imaged by ESA´s Mars Express on 4 January. The ℠twin´ craters are in the Thaumasia Planum region, a large plateau that lies immediately to the south of Valles Marineris, the largest canyon in the Solar System. The northernmost (right) large crater in this scene was officially given the name Arima in early 2012, but the southernmost...

Changes In Martian Sand Dunes Monitored By Mars Orbiter
2012-05-09 15:13:05

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has revealed that movement in sand dune fields on the Red Planet occurs on a surprisingly large scale, about the same as in dune fields on Earth. This is unexpected because Mars has a much thinner atmosphere than Earth, is only about one percent as dense, and its high-speed winds are less frequent and weaker than Earth's. For years, researchers debated whether sand dunes observed on Mars were mostly fossil features related to past climate, rather than...

Image 1 - New Mystery On Mars' Forgotten Plains
2011-10-12 09:23:41

One of the supposedly best understood and least interesting landscapes on Mars is hiding something that could rewrite the planet´s history. Or not. In fact, about all that is certain is that decades of assumptions regarding the wide, flat Hesperia Planum are not holding up very well under renewed scrutiny with higher-resolution, more recent spacecraft data. "Most scientists don't want to work on the flat things," noted geologist Tracy Gregg of The University at Buffalo, State...

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2010-06-24 14:45:00

Minerals in northern Mars craters seen by two orbiters suggest that a phase in Mars' early history with conditions favorable to life occurred globally, not just in the south. Southern and northern Mars differ in many ways, so the extent to which they shared ancient environments has been open to question. In recent years, the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter and NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have found clay minerals that are signatures of a wet environment at thousands of...

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2010-01-04 08:05:00

Spectacular satellite images suggest that Mars was warm enough to sustain lakes three billion years ago, a period that was previously thought to be too cold and arid to sustain water on the surface, according to research published today in the journal Geology. The research, by a team from Imperial College London and University College London (UCL), suggests that during the Hesperian Epoch, approximately 3 billion years ago, Mars had lakes made of melted ice, each around 20km wide, along parts...

2008-09-27 09:00:17

By AARON MACKEY Mars may have had water coursing through its red soil for a billion years longer than scientists previously had thought, increasing the possibility that the planet could have supported life, research conducted by a Tucson-based institute shows. Using high-resolution images from a camera developed at the University of Arizona, researchers with the Planetary Science Institute examined soil deposits on plains that surround a vast canyon network that runs around the planet's...


Word of the Day
cacodemon
  • An evil spirit; a devil.
  • A nightmare.
  • In astrology, the twelfth house of a scheme or figure of the heavens: so called from its signifying dreadful things, such as secret enemies, great losses, imprisonment, etc.
'Cacodemon' comes from a Greek term meaning 'evil genius.'
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