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Latest Geomorphology Stories

2013-03-05 15:10:27

As the Colorado River winds through the Colorado Plateau's soft sedimentary strata, it picks up a tremendous amount of sediment. This sediment — which once left the river's waters so muddy that Spanish explorers christened it El Rio Colorado "the reddish river" — is a vital component to the unique ecosystems of the river. However, with the construction of the Hoover and Glen Canyon dams, which trap the sediment, the once-turbid waters have become a dazzling blue-green, signaling...

Scientists Study El Yunque’s Exceptionally Slow Erosion
2013-02-28 20:32:08

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The lush tropical island of Puerto Rico is completely covered with plants and fauna. The exception to this rule resides on the large, majestic, flat-topped promontory known as El Yunque. El Yunque, Spanish for “the anvil,” rises high into the sky above the rivers and streams that run below, and has been a Puerto Rican icon since pre-Columbian times. Researchers from the National Science Foundation´s (NSF)...

Siberia Could Experience Widespread Permafrost Thaw Due To Global Warming
2013-02-23 09:07:48

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online More evidence is pointing to the nightmare scenario that global warming is taking a toll on our planet. Oxford University scientists say that a global temperature rise of 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit could thaw the ground over a large area of Siberia, threatening the release of carbon from soil. If the thawing of Siberia's permafrost occurs, it could see that over 1,000 gigatons of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and methane are...

Arctic Permafrost Melt Releasing Carbon Dioxide At Unprecedented Rate
2013-02-12 09:23:50

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Editor's note (Feb 16): This story earlier reported that thermokarst failures were occurring do to permafrost melt. However, permafrost doesn't melt, it thaws. The changes have been made to this story to reflect that. Researchers studying Arctic thermokarst failures in Alaska were alarmed to find climate-warming carbon dioxide gas may be releasing into the atmosphere at an unprecedented rate. This release is being caused by...

2013-02-11 16:17:40

University of Oregon-led study in the Umpqua River Valley provides a pointer for river conservation efforts A study of the Umpqua River basin in the Oregon Coast Range helps explain natural processes behind the width of valleys and provides potentially useful details for river restoration efforts designed to improve habitats for coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Coho salmon thrive in broad, flat valleys that contain multiple auxiliary channels to the main river. These valleys formed...

Antarctica's Salty Don Juan Pond Offers Watery Hope For Mars
2013-02-07 15:42:19

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Several bodies of water around the world are known for their salty content. Among the most well-known are the Great Salt Lake in Utah and the Dead Sea. But these bodies of water pale in comparison to Don Juan Pond in Antarctica, known as the saltiest body of water on Earth. The pond, situated in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of the harsh, icy continent, keeps from freezing because of its salt-rich composition. But why this landlocked...

2013-01-07 10:10:40

Berkeley Lab research could lead to a better understanding of the Arctic ecosystem´s impact on the planet's climate What does pulling a radar-equipped sled across the Arctic tundra have to do with improving our understanding of climate change? It´s part of a new way to explore the little-known world of permafrost soils, which store almost as much carbon as the rest of the world´s soils and about twice as much as is in the atmosphere. The new approach combines several...

Using Math To Better Understand River, Valley Networks
2012-12-06 16:23:13

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers wrote in a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) that they have used math to explain different characteristics of river and valley networks. Rivers and valleys form intricate branching patterns, which have inspired some scientists to develop a theoretical understanding of river-network geometry. MIT scientists have created a mathematical theory to discover a common...

GI Researcher Co-author Of Report On International Permafrost
2012-11-28 09:25:17

University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Alaska Fairbanks researcher Vladimir Romanovsky is one of four scientists who authored a report released today by the United Nations Environmental Programme. The report, "Policy Implications of Warming Permafrost," seeks to highlight the potential hazards of carbon dioxide and methane emissions from warming permafrost, which have not thus far been included in climate-prediction modeling. The report notes that permafrost covers almost a...


Latest Geomorphology Reference Libraries

Desert greening
2013-04-25 16:10:03

Desert greening is made up of any number of methods used to revitalize deserts. So far, only arid and semi-arid desert are meant when using this expression. The icy deserts and other types are considered to be unsuitable. The different methods include landscaping methods to reduce evaporation, erosion, consolidation of topsoil, temperature, sandstorms and more, permaculture in general, planting trees, regeneration of salty, polluted, or degenerated soils, floodwater retention and...

Theodore Roosevelt National Park
2013-04-18 01:20:13

Theodore Roosevelt National Park is located in western North Dakota in the United States. The park contains 70,446 acres of land that is separated into three distinct badland areas known as the Elkhorn Ranch Unit, the South Unit, and the North Unit. Roosevelt  first visited the area in 1883, while hunting for bison, and is said to have “fallen in love” with the badlands. After investing a large sum of money into the Maltese Cross Ranch, Roosevelt had his own cabin built, which he later...

Badlands National Park
2013-03-05 09:07:20

Badlands national Park is located in the southwest region of South Dakota. It holds 242,756 acres of land, with 64,144 acres comprising a protected wilderness area. The park was designated as a national monument in 1929 and established in 1939, but attained national park status in 1978. The Stronghold Unit area of the park is managed by the National Park Service and the Oglala Lakota tribe and holds many sights including those used for Ghost Dances in the 1890’s, a bomb and gunnery range...

22_88c53d3e3f6ea92cc8e0c22906f90b30
2009-07-06 18:07:31

A drainage divide, water divide, divide, or watershed is the line that separates neighboring drainage basins. In flat country the divide may be invisible (just a notional line on the ground either side of which water starts its journey to different waterways). While, in hilly country, the divide lies along peaks and ridges. Drainage divides are important geographical, and sometimes political boundaries. Roads and railways often follow divides to minimize slopes and marshes and rivers....

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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